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Thing Called Love, The (1993)

by Carol Heikkinen.
Second Draft, May 1992.

More info about this movie on IMDb.com


FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY


FADE IN:

INT. APARTMENT - DAY

A small New York City apartment, sparsely furnished. MIRANDA
PRESLEY, 21, sits on the floor amid moving boxes and suitcases packing to move 
out.  Sheís sorting through a stack of old record albums, looking through them as she 
piles them in a box.  We catch sight of some relics from the disco era as well as several  
classic country albums - Donny Osmond and the ďSaturday Night FeverĒ soundtrack 
mixed in with Patsy Cline and Hank Williams and Elvis. After a brief look, she piles 
them in a box and closes the lid.   She looks outside her window and sees the sun 
coming up; sheís been up all night.

Miranda goes over to the window and opens it.   Itís barely light out, but already the 
sound of someoneís radio filters in.  We hear a car alarm going off in the distance.  
Miranda drags a large,  full trash bag over to the window,  looks down,  and heaves it 
out.

EXT.  MIRANDAíS APARTMENT BUILDING - DAY

The trash bag falls from a fifth-floor window and into a dumpster overflowing with 
about ten huge trash bags;  Mirandaís thrown out a lot of stuff.   The garbage truck 
arrives just as the bag lands in the dumpster.

EXT.  MIRANDAíS APARTMENT BUILDING - DAY

The sunís all the way up now.   Itís a bright June morning.  Two teenage boys sit on the 
stoop next to Mirandaís building.  They have a boom box,  and we hear loud street 
music.  Miranda comes out of her building carrying a moving box.  She wears Leviís cut 
off mid-thigh, sneakers, and a black leather jacket over a white y-shirt.  She carries the 
box down the front steps and drops it on a pile on the sidewalk in front of a waiting cab.  
The cab driver just leans against his car, watching her work.

MIRANDA
You know what would be great?   If you
could just stand there, watching me carry
all these boxes out by myself.   Donít
carry out any yourself,   donít hold the
door for me,  and whatever you do, donít
put them in your cab.   And if you could
possible start the meter running now. . .

She leans over and peers into the cab.   The meterís running.   She smiles at the cab 
driver,  who doesnít seem to understand English.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Perfect.  Good job.  Thank you.

She gives him a thumbs up.   He smiles and gives her one back.   She goes back for 
another box

EXT.   APARTMENT BUILDING - DAY

We see the cab parked in from of a luxury high-rise apartment building.   The cab driver 
leans again the car, waiting.

INT.  ELLEN DALYíS APARTMENT - DAY

A large,  expensively furnished apartment.    Mirandaís boxes are piled in the hallway.   
ELLEN DALY,  43,  and immaculately dressed socialite,  looks with mild distaste at the 
boxes cluttering her hallway.

ELLEN
. . . I just never imagined there would be this much,  Miranda.

Miranda stands in the living room, looking at pictures of Ellen and a family that doesnít 
include Miranda - a respectable, clean-cut husband and two perfect little boys.  There is 
one small picture of Miranda;  she looks like sheís still in high school.

MIRANDA
You should see how much I threw out.

Ellen walks in and sits on the couch.   She sits formally;  she doesnít exactly radiate 
warmth.   Miranda turns away from the photos.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
You can ship them to me as soon as I get
an apartment.

ELLEN
Maybe I should keep them in storage until
you come back.

MIRANDA
Iím not coming back.

Ellen looks at her like she doesnít believe her, but sheíll go along.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Mom,  I told you,  Iím moving.

Ellen occupies her hands by compulsively straightening the books on her coffee table,  
which were already pretty straight.

ELLEN
Saying youíre going to do something and
actually doing it are two entirely
different things.   I hate to see you give
up everything to go and pursue this . . .
fantasy you have about being  a . . . country
singer.   Have you taken a moment to stop
and look at your behavior?

MIRANDA
Iíll do it on the bus, O.K.? 

Ellen assumes the role of the voice of reason.

ELLEN
I know you father made Nashville sound
very romantic.   I wish he were here now to
see you acting this way.   He could tell
you how difficult it is.

MIRANDA
Thatís not what heíd tell me.
	(sadly,  remembering)
Daddy would tell me I can anything in
the world.

ELLEN
Yes,  he probably would, but in the real
world, the chances of making it are a
million to one.

MIRANDA
How can I pass up a one in a million
opportunity?

She smiles.   Ellen doesnít.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
I donít expect you to understand why I
have to do this.   I just want you to send
me my stuff.

ELLEN
I really think you should think about this
for a few days.

MIRANDA
(determined)
Iíve been thinking about it my whole life.
Itís time for me to do it.

Mirandaís saying this more for her own benefit; her mother doesnít seem to be listening.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
I have to go.   My cab is waiting.

She goes to her mother and kisses her on the cheek.

APARTMENT BUILDING - DAY

Miranda comes out of the building and crosses the sidewalk to the cab.   She talks to the 
driver,  not expecting him to understand

MIRANDA
My mother thinks she can control my life.

Surprisingly,  the driver speaks,  with a heavy foreign accent.

DRIVER
She stills sees you as a little girl.

Miranda looks only mildly surprised that the driver has understood everything  she has 
said.   She gets in the cab.

EXT.  HIGHWAY - DAY

We hear a simple country ballad.   A Greyhound bus travels through the mountains.

INT.  BUS - DAY

Miranda sits in a window seat,  asleep,  resting  her head against her jacket.

INT.  BUS - NIGHT

Mirandaís in the same seat, awake now,  staring out the window into the darkness.

EXT.  TRUCK STOP - DAY

The bus is making a rest stop.  (We see that the destination sign reads ďNashvilleĒ.)  
Passengers walk around,  stretching their legs.   Miranda leans against a wall, checking 
her watch, impatient.

INT.  NASHVILLE GREYHOUND STATION - DAY

We still hear the country music.   Miranda comes into the terminal, carrying a huge 
suitcase and a guitar.   She squints at the light, reaches into her jacket pocket, pulls out 
her sunglasses and puts them on.   She looks around.   A man in a cowboy hat sits on a 
bench.   He gives Miranda a friendly smile and an almost tip of the hat.   She looks at 
him like sheís trying to figure out what species he is and drags her stuff outside.

EXT.  GREYHOUND STATION - DAY

Miranda looks around and spots a taxi across the street.   She puts her index and middle 
fingers inside her mouth of whistles.   Everyone within earshot turns and looks at her.    
The taxi driver looks up from his newspaper.

INT.  TAXI - DAY

Miranda gets in the back of the cab.   The driver closes the trunk and gets in front. 

DRIVER
Where to?

Miranda hands him a newspaper clipping.

MIRANDA
Do you know where this is?   Lucyís Cafť?

DRIVER
Theyíd have to take away my license if I
didnít.

He starts to drive.

EXT.  SIDEWALK - DAY

Close on a guitar case.   Then another, and another,  separated by a row of blue-jeaned 
knees and cowboy boots.

Now we see faces,  some young,  some not-so-young,  some hopeful, some weary.   All 
are patient,  lined up against a brick wall, an incongruous sight at any mini-mall but this 
one.

FEMALE VOICE  (O.S.)
O.K.   Listen up.   Gentlemen,  ladies.

Everyone in line quiets down.   They turn their attention to LUCY JENKINS, 30ís, the 
owner of Lucyís Cafť.

LUCY
As you go in, make sure you take an
application.  No one tries out without
filling one of these out.   Hurry it up,
doors close at 3:05.   Anyone not inside
by 3:05 gets locked out.

Lucy goes back inside.   The line files in.

INT.  TAXI - DAY

The driver turns to talk to Miranda.
DRIVER
You a songwriter?

MIRANDA
No.
DRIVER
Lucky for you.   Townís full of them.   Iím
a songwriter myself.

MIRANDA
Iím a singer.

The driver reacts to this silently;  sheís not lucky after all.
INT.  LUCYíS CAF… -DAY

A cozy restaurant with small tables,  country music memorabilia on the walls, and a 
small stage.

Lucy stand on the stage with a stack of completed applications in her hand.

LUCY
Thank you all for coming today.  When I
call your name,  come right up on stage.
Pretend like youíre in a hurry,  we got all
day but thereís a lot of people want to be
famous here.  If itís your first time
here,  you should know:  if you donít pass,
it just means I donít think youíre ready.
Go home and keep at it and come back
again.  Donít give up unless you canít
stand to listen to your own material. All
right,  letís get to it.

Lucy looks at the first application.

LUCY (CONTíD)
Cash Wilneck,  get on up here.

INT.  TAXI - DAY

The driver hands the clipping back to Miranda.  She takes it, then moves her hand in the 
air over the back of the driverís seat.

MIRANDA (CONTíD)
Whereís the safety glass?

He glances over his shoulder at her;  what safety glass?

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
I could shoot you if I wanted.

This is an observation,  not a threat.

DRIVER
(smiles)
Appreciate it if you didnít.

INT. LUCYíS CAF… - DAY

A young man takes the stage,  sits on the stool and begins singing a mediocre country 
ballad, slightly out of tune.

EXT. LUCYíS CAF… - DAY

Miranda, carrying her guitar in one hand and her suitcase in the other, gets out of the 
cab and heads for the entrance of Lucyís

At the same time, JAMES WYNN, 23,  gets out of his pick-up truck in Lucyís parking 
lot.   James is good-looking in a somewhat dangerous way.   He picks up his guitar case 
and strides over to Lucyís, getting there just before Miranda.   He tries the door.   Itís 
locked.

MIRANDA
Itís locked?

James looks at her, the way sheís dressed,  the huge suitcase she carries.   He looks 
amused.

JAMES
Was your bus late?

She gives him the same attitude back.

MIRANDA
As a matter of fact . . .

JAMES
Well,   itís a long way from . . . New York
City.

MIRANDA
Yes it is.  Who are you?  The psychic
welcoming committee?

JAMES
James Wynn.   The door is locked.

MIRANDA
Miranda Presley.   Iíll just knock.

She goes up to the door.

JAMES
No,  donít.  Lucy doesnít let anyone in
late.   Thatíll set me back a month.  Weíll
have to get in some other way.

MIRANDA
Iím sure thereís a secret underground 
tunnel.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - DAY

Another young songwriter auditions.   This one plays the fiddle and has a friend backing 
him up on guitar.   Heís energetic, but the song isnít very good.

Lucy sits in the back of the crowded room.   She reveals no expression as she watches 
the songwriter, but we see her head shake ďnoĒ slightly as she makes a notation on his 
application and places it in what is presumably the reject pile

EXT.  LUCYíS CAF… - DAY

Miranda sits on the sidewalk outside the cafť.   James locks her suitcase in his truck and 
comes and sits down next to her.

MIRANDA
Maybe someone will come out.

JAMES
Thereíll be a lot of people coming out in
about two hours.

MIRANDA
Did I mention that I can vaporize myself
like ďI Dream of JeannieĒ?

JAMES
A lot of good that does me.

They sit there a moment.

JAMES (CONTíD)
I have an idea.  Letís knock.

MIRANDA
Itís true.   Everyone is slower down here.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - DAY
Onstage, a woman with teased blond hair,  fringed cowboy shirt,  and matching white 
cowboy hat and boots,  stands with her guitar,  dancing around as she sings off-key.

EXT.  LUCYíS CAF… - DAY
Miranda knocks quietly on the door.   No answer.   She knocks a little louder.  The 
door opens.   She gives James a look.   A face appears from inside;  it belongs to 
LINDA LUE LINDEN, 20, a sweetly attractive Southern belle.   She puts her finger to 
her lips and lets them in.

The blond woman finishes and steps off the stage.   Lucy calls out the next name.

LUCY
Nick Reynolds.

NICK REYNOLDS, early 30ís,  gets up to and goes to the stage.  James and Miranda 
sit down with Linda Lue at a table near the door.   Linda Lue finds some blank 
applications on the next table and hands them to James and Miranda.

Nick takes the stage.   He wears a baseball cap with a trucking company logo.   He sits 
at the microphone and addresses the room.

NICK
Hi, Iím Nick Reynolds.  Iím from Memphis,
originally.  This oneís called ďShoot me 
up,  run me down,  take me back,Ē and itís
dedicated to you,  Lucy.

Lucy seems unmoved by the sentiment.  A few auditioners smile knowingly.   Nick 
starts to play.   He seemed like a pretty soft-spoken guy up till now, but he was 
apparently saving his personality for his performance.   The song is humorous, about 
cartoonishly extreme devotions to a woman who wonít pay him any attention.   Nickís 
fellow musicians are a good audience, laughing in the appropriate places.

Lucy doesnít laugh at the song; she matter-of-factly moves Nickís application into the 
ďyesĒ pile.

CUT TO:
LUCY  (O.S.)
Next.   Linda Lue Linden.

We see Lucy look up,  amused.

LUCY  (CONTíD)
Goodness,  honey,  is that your name?

Linda Lue hurries toward the stage.

LINDA LUE
Iím afraid so.
	(smiling,  into the microphone)
Hi,   Iím Linda Lue,  from Briar Hill,
Alabama.   I jut finished this one,  itís
called  ďHeaven knocked on my door.Ē

Linda Lue starts her song;  she has a sweet voice, but itís weak.  Her song is cute,  
using silly metaphors.  Sheís not awful, but sheís not especially good, either.

CUT TO:

Onstage,  a young singer, eyes closed beneath his cowboy hat, sings a heartfelt ballad.  
Heís pretty good.  While heís performing,  James takes his and Mirandaís completed 
applications over to Lucyís table.  He presents them confidently,  as if he has no doubt 
sheíll accept them.   Lucy raises any eyebrow at him, but takes the applications.

CUT TO:

KYLE DAVIDSON, 22, sits on the stool.   Heís clean cut, wearing jeans and boots, but 
no hat.  He looks a little jumpy.

KYLE
Iím, um, Kyle Davidson.  Iím from Texas.
(laughs nervously)
Iím a little nervous,  but it doesnít
really show.

Kyle clears his throat and stares at the floor.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
This song is called ďBlue and Blue.Ē

Kyle seems to be more than just a little nervous;  he barely manages to raise his head 
high enough to sing into the mike.  He sings without confidence, his voice cracking.  
The songs sounds like it might actually be good if he wasnít butchering it.  Lucy stares 
at Kyle, deep in thought, holding his application.  Miranda watches him too, listening 
closely to his song.

CUT TO:

Lucyís down to the last two applications.   She calls Jamesí name out, an edge in her 
voice.

LUCY
James Wynn

James gets up and picks up his guitar.   He strides up and sits on the stool.   He looks 
straight out at the audience and introduces himself.  His stage manner is folksy.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Howdy.  James Wynn,  from Austin,  Texas.  I
call this one ďFriends no more.Ē

He strums the guitar and starts to sing.   His voice is strong,  and heís a charismatic 
performer.   His song is great too  (a ballad, e.g.  ďIt Only Hurts Me When I CryĒ).  The 
audience is drawn into his performance.

CUT TO:

Lucy holds the last application.

LUCY
Miranda Presley,  looks like you get to be
the fat lady.

Miranda takes the stage.  She looks good.  Not too nervous.

MIRANDA
Hi,  Iím Miranda Presley from New York
City.

She starts to play.   She didnít mention the name of her song, but thatís all right because 
we already know this song.   Itís ďDesperadoĒ.  Miranda closes her eyes as she starts 
the lyrics

She has a beautiful voice,   very distinctive,   and the song sounds great.   Just as she 
finishes the first verse,  we hear:

LUCY  (O.S.)
Excuse me.   Excuse me.   Miranda?   Honey,
do you have another song?

Miranda smiles, rolling with the punches.

MIRANDA
Sure.   I know lots of songs.   What do you
want to hear?

LUCY  (O.S.)
Try something I havenít heard before.   A
Miranda Presley composition,   maybe.   This
ainít ďStar SearchĒ.

MIRANDA
Oh.   Well, I donít have anything right
now.

Lucy picks up her pile of applications and approaches the stage.  Auditions are over.

LUCY
Well,   come on back when you do,  O.K.?

Miranda hops off the stage, spirit intact.

MIRANDA
Sure thing.

Lucy shakes her head in wonder at the girl and walks up to the microphone.

LUCY
Now.   Iím going to read off the names of
the people who passed for next monthís
performances.   If I read your name,  come
see me to sign up for which night you want
to play.    Nancy Butterworth,   Nick
Reynolds,   Tom Mortenson,  Ricky Hogan,
James Wynn. . . .

EXT.  PARKING LOT - NIGHT
James and Miranda stand next to his truck.   He opens the passenger door and takes out 
her suitcase.   He sets it on the ground.   She looks disappointed;  she doesnít know 
where sheís going to go now.

JAMES
You want a lift somewhere?

MIRANDA
Why, I would be much obliges if you would
convey me in this Glen Campbell Hee-Haw
pick-up truck.

James picks up the suitcase and tosses it in the back of the truck.

JAMES
Just so you know, Iím not taking this
personally,  these little jabs and put-
downs about what a yee-haw hillbilly town
you have landed your cosmopolitan self in.
Where are you staying?

MIRANDA
I havenít decided.

Miranda sees Linda Lue crossing the parking lot next to her car and calls to her.

MIRANDA
Linda Lue Linden.

Linda Lue turns around.   She looks pleased to be noticed,   and comes over.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Thanks for sneaking us in.

LINDA LUE
Oh,   youíre welcome.   I donít normally
flaunt the rules,  but my little voice told
me I should open that door.   And I do
believe it was right.
	(to James)
You were real good.   You got a lot of
presence up there.  Some people,  they sing
real good,  but they got no presence,  you
know?

JAMES
Thanks.

One of the singers approaches;  his truck is parked next to Jamesí.  We recognize him as 
Kyle,  the one with stage fright.   He notices James.

KYLE
James,   right?   Kyle Davidson.

They shake hands

KYLE  (CONTíD)
Nice job tonight.   First time?

JAMES
	(nods)
First week in town.

MIRANDA
	(to Kyle)
Did you make it?

He seems a little startled by her directness.

KYLE
No.

MIRANDA
Too bad.   I liked your song.

He looks at her skeptically;  is she making fun of him?

KYLE
Yeah,  I liked yours too.   Always have.

She laughs,  then starts to sing Kyleís song a cappella.  If we didnít know it before, we 
now know itís a beautiful song.   She sings just the first verse and stops.   Kyle stares at 
her,   drawn into her singing,  hearing his song the way it should be.   Even after she 
stops,  he stares at her.   Finally,  he grins.

KYLE
Thatís it exactly.   How did you know that?

Miranda doesnít see what heís so excited about.

MIRANDA
All I did was sing it on key.

KYLE
Are you going to Redís?   A bunch of us are
going to Redís.   For a beer.

Kyle looks like itís important to him that she goes.

LINDA LUE
That sounds like fun.

MIRANDA
	(to James)
Are you going?

JAMES
I am.



 
MIRANDA
	(to Kyle)
See you there.

INT.  REDS BAR - NIGHT

Miranda, James, Kyle and Linda Lue sit together at a table.   We see quite a few familiar 
faces from Lucyís audition at surrounding tables.   Everyone has a bottle of beer except 
for Linda Lue, who drinks a Shirley Temple.

MIRANDA
	(to Linda Lue)
Donít even tell me;  you have least. . .
three relatives who have died of
consumption.

Linda Lue seems pleased with Mirandaís accuracy.

LINDA LUE
Well,  itís four if you count Eddie.   He
was my motherís second cousin on her
motherís side.   He was found at the bottom
of my inflatable play pool.   I found him,
actually.

KYLE
	(Whispering, to James)
The bottom of the pool?

Linda Lue goes on cheerfully,  oblivious of the stunned reaction.

LINDA LUE
I noticed you have your suitcase.   Do you
have a place to stay?

Miranda just looks at her.

LINDA LUE (CONTíD)
I have a real cute motel room,  with two
beds.   Thereís even a pool,  shaped like a
guitar.  We could share it.

JAMES
	(To Miranda,  pointedly)
She has a pool.

MIRANDA
Youíve known me fifteen minutes and you
want me to move in?   I could be a serial 
killer,  for all you know.
	

LINDA LUE
Oh,  I can see that youíre not.   Iím an
excellent judge of character.   Iíve got a
touch of the power.

Miranda doesnít want to ask what the power is.

KYLE
My grandmother can tell when a tornado is
coming,  a week in advance.

Linda Lue nods; she knows exactly what he means.

LINDA LUE
Some things are beyond our comprehension.
	(to Kyle)
Let me see your palm.

He gives it to her.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
Now you,  you got a real strong heart line,
see it here.

KYLE
Is that good?

LINDA LUE
Well,  sure,  but it can also be a little
dangerous.   My cousin Lester,  he had a
similar heart line,  and he threw himself
in front of a speeding train in the name
of love.

Miranda smirks.

MIRANDA
My cousin Leon did the very same thing.

LINDA LUE
Isnít that a coincidence.   You want me to
do yours?	

Linda Lue reaches for Mirandaís hand.  Miranda drops the parasol and lets her have it.

MIRANDA
If Iím going to meet with a bizarre
premature death,  Iíd just as soon not know
about it

Linda Lue looks up from Mirandaís palm and answers her gravely.

LINDA LUE
All right.
	(looking at Mirandaís hand)
Oh,  well I envy you this life line.
Youíre going to make your mark.  People
will remember you when youíre gone.

Miranda pulls her hand back.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
Iím not saying itíll be soon.  Donít you
want me to read your heart line?

Miranda doesnít offer her hand.

MIRANDA
No.       Thanks.

JAMES
Hey,  let me see your heart line.

Miranda holds out her hand.   James pretends to examine it.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
You will remain unmarried until the age of
60 . . . at which time you will wed a series
of men with one common characteristic.

MIRANDA
Namely?

He squints at her palm.

JAMES
They will all be named Bubba.   Sometimes
it will be a nickname,  or a middle name.

Miranda carefully extracts her hand from Jamesí.   He looks at her suggestively,  as if 
sheís fighting the impulse to jump him.   She answers with a ďget realĒ look.

The music on the jukebox has stopped.  Miranda reaches for her guitar.  She starts to 
play a song.   James watches her,  hears the opening chords, and reaches for his guitar.

James starts playing the same song as Miranda,  ďI donít know why you donít want 
me.Ē  Miranda begins to sing.

MIRANDA
	(singing)
Itís the right time,  and though I feel
fine tonight. . .

JAMES
	(singing)
I donít know why you donít want me


MIRANDA
	(singing)
Itís the right place,  Iíve got the new
face tonight. . .

JAMES
	(singing)
I donít know why you donít want me.

Kyle and Linda Lue join in.   Soon the other hopefuls from the audition are singing 
along,  commiserating abut their rejection.

INT.  MOTEL ROOM - NIGHT

Linda Lue has apparently had a hand in the decorating of this room; itís hard to believe 
the motel provided matching floral chintz drapes,  bedspreads,  and pillows,  or a framed 
photo of Loretta Lynn.   Linda Lueís dog,  of the tiny furry white variety, sits on his 
own floral pillow.  Miranda throws her suitcase on one of the beds.

LINDA LUE
You can have either bed.   Iíve been using
this one . . .

She points to the one Miranda has not chosen.

LINDA  LUE  (CONTíD)
. . . but you can take whichever you want.

Miranda leaves her suitcase where it is and looks around.  There are several stacks of 
Bibles in the room.   She lifts the cover of one,  verifying what it is,  and decides not to 
deal with this information.

MIRANDA
Is this the extra,  the Loretta Lynn suite?

She flops down on the bed,  her eyes closed.   Linda Lueís dog comes over and sniffs 
Miranda,  then settles in next to her.   Miranda opens her eyes,  sees the dog,  and closes 
them again.   The phone rings.  Linda Lue picks it up.

LINDA LUE
	(into phone)
Hello?   Hi, Mama. . .  Well,  I just got in
this second,  Mama. . .  Things are real
good. . .

Linda Lue sits up straight,  her right hand flat on her bed.   Without looking down,  she 
crosses her fingers,  first on her right hand,  then on her left,  the one holding the phone.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
Uh-huh.
	(brightly)
I passed my audition.

Mirandaís eyes open;   she tilts her head back and looks at Linda Lue upside down.   
Sheís surprised at the lie but,  then again,  she really doesnít give a shit.   Miranda gets 
up and opens her suitcase.   She takes out a pair of jeans.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
Well, I was waiting for you take a
breath,  Mama,  so I could get a word in. . .
Yeah,   just like Loretta. . .

Linda Lue rolls her eyes at Miranda, whoís changing into the jeans.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
Only prettier.

Miranda smiles.   She pulls a black leather-bound notebook out of her suitcase and picks 
up her guitar.   Linda Lue covers the mouthpiece with her hand.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
Are you going somewhere?

MIRANDA
Iím just going to go to that coffee shop
across the street.

She takes her motel room key off the table and puts it on a chain around her neck,  next 
to several other keys and a locket.

LINDA LUE
But itís late.    Donít you want to go to
bed?

MIRANDA
Iím not tired.   Iíll be quiet when I come
in.

Linda Lue is perplexed.

LINDA LUE
Well,  all right.   Iíll be seeing you.

MIRANDA
Goodnight,  Scarlett.

Miranda leaves.

LINDA LUE
	(into phone)
Iím listening,  Mama.  Who died?   Well,
what was it that killed him?

INT.  COFFEE SHOP - NIGHT

Miranda is settled into a booth,  a full cup of coffee in front of her, circling classifieds in 
a newspaper.   She doesnít seem to be finding too much.   Linda Lue enters the coffee 
shop, wearing a frilly pink robe over flowered pajamas with feet and furry bedroom 
slippers.   Her hair is pulled back with a  pink band.   She looks like an exceptionally tall 
five-year-old.   She spots Miranda and pads over to her table.   Miranda looks at her and 
puts down her paper.

LINDA LUE
Did I remember to give the spare room
key?	

MIRANDA
Annette,  Iíve got a hot tip that Frankie
and his friends are going to crash your
slumber party.  You donít want to miss
that.

Linda Lue sits  down across from her.

LINDA LUE
Do you hate me?

MIRANDA
How could anyone possibly hate you?
Youíre Miss Congeniality.

LINDA LUE
I was hoping we could be great friends.

MIRANDA
I donít know if thatís such a fabulous
idea.

LINDA LUE
Why not?

Miranda glances down at Linda Lueís foot,  which sticks out from under the table.

MIRANDA
	(noticing)
Your pajamas have feet.

Linda Lue waits for an answer.

   
MIRANDA (CONTíD)
Look,   I came here to be alone.   Nothing
personal.

Linda Lue looks hurt.    Miranda smiles at her kindly.

MIRANDA (CONTíD)
Nothing personal.   I swear.   Cross my
heart.

Linda Lue draws herself up and speaks with conviction.

LINDA LUE
Some people arenít exactly the people you
they are when you first meet 
someone.

She gets up and pads out of the coffee shop.   Miranda watcher her go.

INT.  COFFEE SHOP - MORNING

The sunís just coming up.   Mirandaís still in her booth,  her head resting on her arm, 
asleep.   The waitress comes up with a pot of coffee and touches her on the arm.

WAITRESS
More coffee,  honey?

Miranda looks up, then out the window,  squinting at the sun.

MIRANDA
No,  thanks.

The waitress leaves.   Miranda puts a couple dollars on the table, picks up her stuff,  and 
leaves.

INT.  MOTEL ROOM - MORNING

Miranda enters the darkened motel room.   The mess she left has been cleaned up;  
apparently Linda Lue unpacked for her.  Miranda pulls off her jeans,  removes her bra 
without taking off her t-shirt,  and crawls into bed.

Meanwhile, in the other bed, Linda Lue opens her eyes, sees Miranda,  and stretches.   
She gets out of bed,  picks up her robe and goes to the bathroom.   The dog jumps off 
Linda Lueís bed and goes to sleep with Miranda.

INT.  MOTEL ROOM - AFTERNOON

Mirandaís still in bed, asleep.   The air conditioner hums.  Thereís a knock on the door.  
Miranda reaches for the clock; itís 3:10.   She gets out of bed and walks over to the 
dresser.   She opens a drawer,  finds a pair of boxer shorts and puts them on.
Another knock.

MIRANDA
Whoís here at this ungodly hour?

She opens the door.   Itís Kyle,  holding his guitar.   She looks out at him sleepily, her 
hair a mess,  pillow marks on her face.   The dog stands at her feet.

KYLE
Hi.        You look good.

MIRANDA
Thanks.

KYLE
What are you,   getting ready to go out?

The dog growls at Kyle.

MIRANDA
Iím thinking thereís some reason youíre 
here.

KYLE
I just saw Linda Lue.   She said youíd be
asleep.

He looks at the dog, who continues a low growl.

MIRANDA
Thanks.   Let me know if she says anything else.

She starts to close the door.

KYLE
Wait.    I wanted to ask you something.

She open the door again.   The dog steps up the growl.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
Is that your dog?

She looks at him;  of course itís not her dog.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
Thatís not my question.   Will you help me
with my singing?

MIRANDA
Is that your question?

KYLE
Thatís it.

MIRANDA
O.K.

KYLE
	(smiles)
Yeah?

MIRANDA
Yeah.

KYLE
Now?

She nods,  tolerant of his excitement.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
Great.   Iíll even make you dinner.

MIRANDA
Give me a minute.

She closes the door.   The dog stops growling.

EXT.  APARTMENT BUILDING ROOF - DUSK

Kyle and Miranda sit in beach chairs on the roof of his apartment building,  with their 
guitars.  Thereís a grill next to Kyle;  heís barbequeing something for dinner.

Kyleís finishing up a song,  a beautiful ballad   (e.g.  ďKeep me from blowing awayĒ).   
His voice is tentative, and he watches his fingers as he plays.

MIRANDA
All right.   Now start the song again,  but
instead of singing,  tell me about your
guitar.

Kyle starts to strum the chords to the song.

KYLE
What do you want to know about it?

MIRANDA
I donít know,  some kind of amusing
anecdote about how your daddy traded a pig
for it,  or the ghost of Hank Williams Sr.
Left it on your front porch.

Kyle has started to watch his fingers again.   He looks up,  decides not to let her get to 
him.

KYLE
My mom gave me this guitar.  She said she
could tell I had a lot of creative energy.

MIRANDA
What about your dad?

KYLE
I donít know,  what about him?

MIRANDA
Anything.    Keep playing.

KYLE
The first time I came to Nashville, I was
here four months before I ran out of money
and had to turn around and come back home.
I thought heíd want me to give it up,
since I hadnít made it.   But he just put
me back to work on the ranch.   Said he
could use me until I was ready to give it
another go.

MIRANDA
Letting life teach you its own lessons,
realizing your dreams werenít the same as
his dreams.

Kyle laughs.

KYLE
Stop me if youíve heard my life story
before.

MIRANDA
I saw that episode of Gunsmoke.  Anyway,
the important thing is youíre playing the
guitar without looking at your fingers.

He stops playing.

KYLE
Of course I donít have to watch my
fingers.  Itís part of my style.

MIRANDA
Well,  donít do it anymore.   Now, look at
me and sing some of the words.

Kyle starts to play again,  looking Miranda in the eye.   He stops, and starts the song 
over.  He opens his mouth,  then shuts it again.  Finally,  he stops playing.

KYLE
I canít do it.

MIRANDA
Why not?

KYLE
Itís personal.   Itís part of me.   You and 
me,  here alone,  my singing to you is
practically like stripping down naked.

Miranda raises her eyebrows,  as if he might actually disrobe.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
Isnít it like that for you, singing one of
your songs?

MIRANDA
It seems to me that this is a rather
serious handicap for an aspiring
performer.

KYLE
I donít want to be a performer.   Iíd have
to be insane to think I could ever make a
dime with this voice.

MIRANDA
I thought you wanted to learn to sing.

KYLE
I do.   So I can sing on writerís night.   I
canít get my songs recorded if nobody
hears them.

MIRANDA
Is that the only way to get them heard?

KYLE
Iíve done about a hundred demos,  me songs
with other singers.   Vince Gill put a song
of mine on hold last summer,  was thinking
about putting it on his new album,  but he
didnít end up cutting it.

Miranda picks up her guitar.

MIRANDA
Well,  maybe if you see yourself as an
actor, like itís not really you.   Play the
part in the song.

She starts to strum a few chords.   She looks Kyle in the eye as she sings,  acting as if 
the words were meant for him.  The sun is setting behind her.

MIRANDA
	(singing)
I loved you yesterday
And I love you just the same
And none of the things you do
Could tear us apart
I loved you yesterday
And I love you just the same
When I gave myself to you
You took only my heart

She puts the guitar down.   Kyle fell for the act;   he looks slightly lovestruck.

KYLE
Thatís nice.   You write that?

MIRANDA
	(shakes her head no)
Lyle Lovett.   Heís my favorite.

KYLE
Youíre not proving your point until you
play me one of your songs.

He gets up to check on the barbeque.

MIRANDA
One of what?

She smiles at him;  she doesnít have any songs.

KYLE
You havenít written any songs?

MIRANDA
Youíre a songwriter.   Iím a singer.

KYLE
You just havenít written any songs yet.
Nobody moves from New York to Nashville to
be a singer.

MIRANDA
Nobody but me.

Kyle shakes his head no.

KYLE
Country musicís all about the words,
having something to say.   You wouldnít be
here if you didnít have those words inside
you.   You just havenít let them out yet.

Miranda considers the potential truth of this.

MIRANDA
Iím the one who dropped my entire life and
moved someplace Iíve never even visited
before.   I should get to figure out why 
the hell I did it.

INT.  COFFEE SHOP - MORNING

Miranda sits at the same table as the day before, a cup of coffee in front of her.  Sheís 
been sleeping;  she raises her head from where it was resting on her arm and squints at 
the daylight.   She sticks a finger in her coffee; itís cold.   She gets our of her both.

INT.  MOTEL ROOM - MORNING

Miranda comes in and gets ready for bed.  Linda Lue isnít in her bed.   We hear water 
running, then singing as she finishes her shower.  The dog jumps into Mirandaís bed.

MIRANDA
Hey,  Buster.

Linda Lue comes out of the bathroom.   Sheís cheerful,  a morning person.   She seems 
a little hesitant about Miranda;  sheís not sure if theyíre fighting.

LINDA LUE
His name ainít Buster.

MIRANDA
What is it?

LINDA LUE
Mr. Dog.

Linda Lue says this as if itís a perfectly normal name.  Miranda pulls on boxer shorts.

MIRANDA
How do you know his first name isnít
Buster?

Linda Lue thinks.   Miranda picks up the dog, puts him on a different part of the bed, 
and gets in.

LINDA LUE
Well,  he would have told me.   We discuss
practically everything.

MIRANDA
Did you unpack my stuff?







LINDA LUE
I put your t-shirts in the second drawer,
your underthings are in the top drawer,
and pretty much everything else is in the
closet, light to dark.

Miranda looks at her disbelievingly; Linda Lue gets nervous.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
Left to right.   There was a lot of black.
I guess you know that.  I canít wear
black,  it just washes me out.  You ainít
mad,  are you?

She doesnít seem the least bit mad.

MIRANDA
Where are my tapes?
LINDA LUE
	(pointing)
There,  in the night table.   You are mad.

MIRANDA
I was thinking about what you said in the
coffee shop.

Linda Lue sits at the foot of the bed,  her tone apologetic.

LINDA LUE
Iím trying to be more forthcoming.

MIRANDA
Well,  then let me ask you something.

Linda Lue nods.
MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Donít most motel rooms have one Bible?

Linda Lue hops up and takes a Bible from one of the piles.

LINDA LUE
I made these myself.  I work at the Praise
The Lord print company.

MIRANDA
You didnít steal these. . .

LINDA LUE
Oh, lord no.   These are all misprints.
(picks one up,  pages through it)
This one has Chapter Four from Yogi Berraís
autobiography right in the middle of Revelations.
Jesus comes back and says       (CONTíD)

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)

ďIt ainít over till itís over.Ē   We
couldnít ship it that way.   People might
think Jesus had already come back,  and
heís been Yogi Berra all along.

MIRANDA
Youíre making this up.

Linda Lue nods.

LINDA LUE
Did you think it was funny?

MIRANDA
	(laughs)
Yes,  I thought it was funny.

LINDA LUE
These really are misprints,  theyíre just
mostly upside down,  though.  But hereís a
booklet thatís supposed to be on how to
accept Jesus Christ as your lord and
savior, and see, itís all recipes for fun
desserts you can make with Cool Whip.  I
didnít make that up, swear to God.

MIRANDA
Iím going to have to remember not to swear 
to anything in this room.

INT.  MUSIC ROW OFFICE - DAY

Miranda,  holding her guitar case, stands in front of the receptionist desk, talking to the 
RECEPTIONIST, an attractive young woman with a Tennessee accent.

RECEPTIONIST
Iím sorry,  he doesnít see anyone without
an appointment.

MIRANDA
O.K.   Letís make a appointment,  then.
Wednesday is good for me.

RECEPTIONIST
You realize I go through this eleven times
a day.  I donít let anyone slip through.

MIRANDA
Ever?   Not even like a really cute guy?

The receptionist smiles and holds out her left hand, revealing her wedding ring.


RECEPTIONIST
Thatís how I met my husband.   Iím afraid
Iím going to have to tell you what I tell
everyone:   when youíre rich and famous,
you can look back on this and thank God
people like me no longer have any control
over you life.

Miranda realizes sheís not going to get anywhere,  and leaves the office.

CUT TO:

MONTAGE  of shots of Miranda trying to get past the front office at other 
management companies on Music Row:

She stands in front of another receptionist and pages through the receptionistís desk 
calendar,  pointing out an empty appointment time.   The girl shakes her head no firmly.

A receptionist pulls out a large cardboard box and shows it to Miranda; we see that itís 
filled to overflowing with tapes.

Miranda open the door at another company and finds a four-piece band auditioning for 
an expressionless receptionist in the waiting area.   Miranda turns to leave,  hoping she 
doesnít look as ridiculous as that.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

The place is about half-full;  the show hasnít started yet.
Miranda, Linda Lue, Kyle,  and James share a table near the stage.

MIRDANDA
So he told me to come back after they
closed and ďtry outĒ, in quotes and
italics, because heís be alone and his
wife is like in Tulsa and I was like,
ďYeah!  Absolutely!   Iíll be back.   Is
there any possibility you could gain some
more weight by tonight,  because I would
fine that really sexy.Ē

KYLE
You didnít say that.

MIRANDA
I did,  actually.

She looks around for their waitress.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Donít we have a waitress?

LINDA LUE
	(to James)
Now, donít you be nervous.   Youíre going
to be just fine.   You get a case of the
nerves,  you arteries can explode.   You
could look healthy as a horse,  except
youíd be dead.   Iíve seen it myself.

JAMES
I donít get nervous.   Thanks for trying to
calm me down,   though.

MIRDANDA
Iím going to the bar.   Anyone want
anything?

KYLE
Beer.

JAMES
Nothing till after I go on.

Miranda looks at Linda Lue

MIRANDA
Iím not ordering a Shirley Temple.

LINDA LUE
Nothing for me,   thanks.

Miranda makes her way over to the bar.   Nick,  the auditioner who dedicated his song 
to Lucy,  sits on a barstool.   Miranda orders from the bartender.

MIRANDA
Two beers and a Shirley Temple.

The bartender raises his eyebrows.   Miranda nods to confirm her order,   then notices 
Nick.

MIRANDA
Hey,   I know you,  from the audition.

NICK
Nick Reynolds

MIRANDA
Miranda Presley.

NICK
Thatís right.   Miranda Presley.  Wrote 
ďDesperadoĒ when you were eight years old.

Miranda smiles;  she doesnít seem embarrassed.

MIRANDA
Iím famous already,  and I canít even find a job.

NICK
Lucy just lost a waitress.   Maybe sheíll
give you a job.

MIRANDA
No.   Iím hot a waitress,  Iím a singer.

NICK
Iím not sure I see the difference.
	(calls to the back room)
Lucy,  come on out here.

Lucy comes out of the back room,  a look of annoyance on her face.  She recognizes 
Miranda.

LUCY
Well,  if it isnít Miss Presley.   What can
I do for you,  honey?

NICK
Sheís interested in the waitress position.
I told her youíd probably want to hire
her.

Both women look at Nick like they wish heíd butt out.  The bartender pages through a 
booklet,  looking for a Shirley Temple recipe.

MIRANDA
Look,   I donít want to be a waitress.

LUCY
Then why am I out here?

Miranda looks at Nick accusingly.

NICK
I donít know,  but you sure do look nice
tonight,  Lucy.  You want to go out later?

LUCY
Nick,  Iíve got a million things to do.
Darcy called me at four in the afternoon
to tell me she was quitting.

NICK
	(mock surprise)
Quitting?   Why?

LUCY
Oh,   sheís going on tour with Rodney
Crowell or some fool thing.

NICK
Whatís she going to do?   Drive the bus?

Nick knows very well what Darcyís going to do.

LUCY
	(to Miranda)
Darcyís a singer.   She met Rodney Crowell
right in the very establishment,   slipped
him a tape,  which is against the rules,
and now sheís singing back-up on his tour.
Nickís a sucker for a happy ending,  but
theyíre few and far between,  if you ask
me.

Lucy heads for the back room.

MIRANDA
Lucy.

She turns around.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
I just wanted to apologize.   For singing
ďDesperadoĒ at the audition.   I knew I was
supposed to sing something I wrote.

LUCY
No apology necessary.   Just donít pull
that again.   Youíre welcome to try out
anytime with something of your own.
	(sighs)
And you can have the waitress job, if you
decide youíre interested by tomorrow
afternoon.   But no passing tapes to the 
customers.

Lucy goes into the back room.    The bartender has finally finished the Shirley Temple,  
and Miranda picks up her drinks.

MIRDANDA
	(to Nick)
You think I should take this job,  donít
you?

NICK
If  you think opportunity keeps dropping by
until you like what heís wearing,  you
might as well pass this up.

MIRANDA
Ever since I crossed the border into
Tennessee,  Itís been an exercise in logic
to get a yes or no answer.

NICK
Personally,  I think you should take the
job.   You got the voice to make it
someday.

Miranda is surprised at the flattery,  but still concerned.

MIRANDA
How long did Darcy work here?

NICK
You donít want to know.

Miranda goes back to her table.   James is going onstage.   The audience applauds.  
Heís confident,  poised.   Two or three musicians assemble behind him to back him up.

JAMES
Hi.   Iím James Wynn.   Iím from Austin,
where we like our music with a few rough
edges.   I hope thatís all right with
yíall.  If you like this one,  maybe you
can tell Lucy,  let her know Nashvilleís
ready for something new for a change.

Miranda looks confused.  She turns to Kyle.

KYLE
I heard he wanted Lucky to let him play
without an audition.    He had all these
reviews from when he played in Austin.   I
also heard that he shot a record executive
in Austin,  but I donít think that partís 
true.

James signals the band and they kick in with an energetic rockabilly-flavored song.   
Heís definitely showing he has the talent to back up his attitude.

EXT.  LUCYíS PARKING LOT - NIGHT

James leans against his truck,  drinking a beer,  talking to the guys who played behind 
him.   Miranda,  Linda Lue  and Kyle come out of the bar.   James says goodnight to the 
musicians and calls out to Miranda.

JAMES
Miranda.   Come here.

She walks over to him,  leaving Linda Lue and Kyle waiting for her.

MIRANDA
You were good.

JAMES
Did you ever have a nickname?

MIRANDA
Is that why you called me over?

JAMES
No.    That was an icebreaker.

He reaches out and takes her hand,  surprising her.

MIRANDA
No.    Did you?

He shakes his head.

JAMES
You want to go out?   Right now?

MIRANDA
Only if you do.

Kyleís talking to Linda Lue.   He looks over and sees James holding Mirandaís hand 
and stops mid-sentence.   Linda Lue turns to look and sees Miranda get into Jamesís 
truck.

LINDA LUE
I guess she found a ride.
	(calls out)
James.    How many beers have you had?

James hold up his beer bottle and tosses it in the trash.

JAMES
One half.   O.K.?  I promise not to run
down any of your relatives.

LINDA LUE
Have a nice time.

EXT.  EMPTY PARKING LOT - NIGHT

A large,  empty bowling alley parking lot.   Jamesís truck travel in circles, tires 
squealing.

INT.  TRUCK - NIGHT

Inside the truck, we see that Miranda is driving.  She grinds the gears and wrestles with 
the steering wheel.   Speed seems to be her only objective.

JAMES
I canít believe youíve never driven
before.

MIRANDA
Iím doing that well?

JAMES
No.   I put that wrong.   I believe you when
you say youíve never driven before.   A
blind man could see youíve never driven
before.

Miranda gives him a look and drives over a cement parking divider.  James gets an idea.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
I know.   Step on the middle pedal.

She hits the brake.   The car stalls.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
My fault.   I forgot to remind you about
the clutch.

He opens the glove box and pulls out a bandana.  He holds it up in front of Miranda,  
trying to put it on her like a blindfold.   She looks at him like heís nuts.

MIRANDA
Maybe this works with other girls . . .

JAMES
Trust me.

She lets him blindfold her.

CUT TO:

INT.   TRUCK - NIGHT

Miranda drives with the blindfold on.   Sheís doing much better driving in slow circles.  
James periodically tells her when to turn,  putting his hand on the steering wheel to help 
her.

JAMES
Not too many people know this, but
Nashville has a giant magnet - itís right
under this very parking lot - that pulls
things in.   People,  pick-up trucks,  old
Roy Orbison eight-tracks.   It pulled you
here.  Turn left.

She turns to look at him,  but canít because of the bandana.

MIRANDA
Why didnít it pull anybody else I know?

JAMES
It doesnít attract everyone.  Just hicks
and hillbillies and a few rednecks.
Songwriters.  People who own cowboy hats,
					(CONTíD

JAMES  (CONTíD)
guys with mustaches.   If you have a
pick-up,  sometimes itíll get pulled with
you in it.   Some people try to ignore it;
they get used to the pull and just never
come.   My theory about you is that youíve
got this stray piece of hillbilly lodged
in you,  probably in one of your shoulders.
You were smart not to fight it.

MIRANDA
You know how you can have a job and an
apartment and friends and you think,  this
is my life.   If I leave this,  I have no
life.

JAMES
Mmm.    Turn right.

She makes the turn easily,   not thinking about the driving.

MIRANDA
Well,  I woke up a few weeks ago and it was
really hot out and sunny and there were
kids everywhere.   It was the first day of
summer vacation,  and it was just like
every other day to me.  I wanted to be
out,  like they were.   I just wanted out.
And I thought,  nothingís holding me here,
I can do whatever the hell I want.  And
if I donít do it now,  Iíll keep going
forever doing what I think I have to do
when actually the only thing thatís 
definite about my life is that Iím in it.
Iím the fucking lead.  I left the next
day.

JAMES
That happened to me when I was seventeen.

MIRANDA
And Iíve always wanted to see Graceland.

JAMES
How fast are you going?

MIRANDA
About twenty?

JAMES
Fourteen.   Shift down and make a sharp
right when I say now. . . . .  Now.

Miranda follows his instructions and pulls smoothly onto the highway

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Speed up.

She does,  shifting into third.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Faster.   Get into fourth.

MIRANDA
Fourth?   I canít go that fast in a parking
lot.

JAMES
Promise me you wonít panic.

He pulls off her blindfold and she sees that sheís driving on the highway.   She smiles, 
proud of herself.

EXT.  HILLSIDE - NIGHT

Miranda and James lie on their stomachs in the back of his pick-up truck, looking off 
into the distance.

MIRANDA
Youíve got a strange idea of a good time.

JAMES
Itís better this way.

We see that they are watching a drive-in movie, except theyíre not at the drive-in;  
theyíre parked overlooking the drive-in.  They have a good view of the screen, but no 
speaker.  Itís a clear summer night,  just barely dark out.  The movie is  ďLove Story.Ē

JAMES  (CONTíD)
You can make up your own story.

James sits up and reaches for his guitar.  He starts to strum the guitar, nods in the 
direction of the screen and sings the first line of a song, making it up as he goes along.  
He plays,  waiting for Miranda to do the second line.  She doesnít.  He keeps making up 
lines, making the song about the characters in the movie.  Suddenly, Miranda comes up 
with a line of her own; itís just as good as one of Jamesí.  She makes up the chorus and 
they sing together.

Miranda rolls over on her back and stares at the sky,  her head flopped out the back of 
the truck.

MIRANDA
I didnít know there were this many stars.

JAMES
Giant magnet.   Whatís your favorite song?

Miranda answers without hesitation.

MIRANDA
ďHooked on a FeelingĒ.

JAMES
Me too.

MIRANDA
Liar.

JAMES
I think you can feel secure in your
position as the only person on the planet
whose favorite song is ďHooked on a 
FeelingĒ.

MIRANDA
Whatís yours?

JAMES
Y.M.C.A.

MIRANDA
Yeah.    Me too.

James laughs.

JAMES
What can you do that no one else can do?

MIRANDA
Nothing.

JAMES
Thereís always something.

MIRANDA
I can do a country version of any Bon Jovi
song.  Any Bon Jovi single.   Except  ďLay
Your Hands on Me.Ē   What about you?

JAMES
I speak Spanish.

MIRANDA
So do a billion other people.

JAMES
Last month,   I punched a record producer in
the face.

MIRANDA
I heard you shot him.  Only he was a label
executive.

JAMES
See,   you should never believe rumors.

MIRANDA
So what happened?

JAMES
I met this producer in Austin,  who wanted
to do some demos with me,  try and get me a
record deal.  then as soon as we got into
the studio,  he started changing my songs,
fucking with them so theyíd sound more
like everyone else.   We had a fundamental
difference of opinion.   And he was a dick.

MIRANDA
So you punched him.

JAMES
I believe in doing what you feel like
doing at any moment in time.

MIRANDA
Whatís it like,  when you sing something
you wrote?

JAMES
Donít you write songs?

MIRANDA
No.   I think I might try it,  though.  This
singing thing isnít really working out.

JAMES
The first time I played one of my songs
and people connected with it,  it was like
sex.  Well,  not exactly.  Like the first
time you kiss someone and your heart kind
of flips, except it doesnít make you feel
weak,  it makes you feel strong.  If you
think itís something you want to do,  you
should try it.

MIRANDA
I think itís something I want to do.

They look straight at each other, lean towards each other and kiss.

EXT.   LUCYíS CAF…  MALL - DAY

Miranda walks down the sidewalk toward Lucyís.  she passes a laundromat.  Inside, a 
man sits on a washing machine playing his guitar and singing while his clothes spin in 
the dryer.  Miranda stops and listens to him a moment;  heís not bad.   She continues 
down the sidewalk and goes inside Lucyís

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

Two singers perform on stage.  We see Miranda moving through the crowd, working as 
a waitress.  Sheís not having an easy time; she sets a beer in front of a customer and he 
indicates that itís not what he ordered and makes her take it back.  She carries the bottle 
back to the bar, where Nick sits at his usual post.

MIRANDA
Did I thank you for bringing glamour and
excitement into my dreary life?

NICK
Did you mess up another one?

She slides the bottle over to the bartender.

MIRANDA
	(to bartender)
Michelob.
	(to Nick)
Beer all tastes the same to me.   Did you
ask her out yet today?

NICK
	(nods)
She declined.  Thanks for inquiring.

MIRANDA
Maybe itís time to fish or cut bait.

NICK
You know that Lyle Lovett song?   Waltzing
Fool?

MIRANDA
Of course.

NICK
	(singing a capella)
The waltzing fool,  he just might be crazy,
cause the waltzing fool keeps the moon in
his car.

MIRANDA
What about it?

NICK
Nothing.

Silence.  Miranda stares at Nick, waiting.

NICK  (CONTíD)
Just might no be so crazy, thatís all.

EXT.  MUSIC ROW - NIGHT

Itís the middle of the night,  pitch dark.  A few of the houses have their lights on.

INT.  STUDIO - NIGHT

Miranda is in a recording studio,  singing the last few lines of a ballad  (e.g.  ďIs there 
life out there?Ē)  over a guitar track recorded earlier.  Kyle is in the booth alone, 
operating the board.

MIRANDA
I could do it better.  Let me do it one
more time.

KYLE
No.    Iím keeping that one.

MIRANDA
We have fifteen minutes.   I can do it
better.

KYLE
Miranda.   That one was perfect.   Wynonna
Judd would use that one.

EXT.  MUSIC ROW - NIGHT

Kyle and Miranda come out of the building where they were recording.  The walk down 
the sidewalk,  Kyle carrying Mirandaís guitar.  Miranda looks down,  not stepping on 
cracks.

MIRANDA
So what are you going to do with the demo?

KYLE
Theyíll put it on a list of available
songs,  and if someone comes in and wants
something like this, they might listen to
it.

MIRANDA
Thatís it?   Thatís how youíre getting it
heard?  Thatís a great song, better than
most of the stuff on the radio.

KYLE
They all sound that way at first,  when
youíre the only one whoís ever hear it.

MIRANDA
Iím telling you,  someone wants this song.
Wynonna Judd want this song,  she just
doesnít know it yet.

KYLE
If thatís true,  sheíll find out soon
enough.

MIRANDA
O.K.   Itís your song.  Iím going to
say two more words.

KYLE
Two words.

MIRANDA
No wonder.

She keeps walking.   Kyle stops.

KYLE
No wonder what?
She doesnít answer.   He thinks.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
No wonder I canít get anything recorded?
No wonder Iíll be just another guy who
never did what he said he was going to?   No
wonder I work in a record store?   Because
I didnít push my songs on every singer I
met?
	(seems to realize something)
Well,  I did that,  for awhile,  but those
songs werenít that good . . .

Miranda stops walking.  She turns and looks at Kyle.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
For your information, I stopped putting
all my energy into every new song because
I didnít want to be so damned disappointed
all the time.

Miranda looks guilty.   She begins an apology.

MIRANDA
Kyle. . .

Kyle sits down on the curb.   Miranda sits next to him.

KYLE
	(realizing)
Youíre right.   No wonder.   How can I
expect anyone else to get excited about my
songs if I donít?  I shouldnít just sit
back and wait for someone to find my
songs;  I should do something to get my
songs heard

He tries to think of an idea.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
What do you think I should do?

Miranda takes the demo tape out of her pocket.

MIRANDA
I think you should - we should - take this
song to Wynonna and get her to listen to
it.

She stands up.  Kyle remains sitting.  She tilts her head - a gesture for him to come on,  
then stars walking away.

KYLE
What,  right now?

He gets up and follows her.

EXT.  WYNONNA JUDDíS HOUSE - NIGHT

Thereís a car parked in the circular driveway.  Kyle and Miranda approach the car, 
trying to be inconspicuous.

MIRANDA
Are you sure this is the right house?  She
parks right out front?   Anyone could break
into her car.

KYLE
I guess weíre the only ones who thought of
it.   Itís her house.   I came to a party
here once.

MIRANDA
So youíre in her social circle,  but we
have to lurk around at dawn to give her a
tape.

KYLE
I was parking cars,  and this wasnít my
idea.

MIRANDA
Give me the thing.

Kyle hands her a slim jim.

KYLE
The thing?    I thought you had done this
before.

MIRANDA
What do you think I am,  a criminal?   Iíve
see it done.   My sixth-grade boyfriend is
doing eighteen months for this.

Kyle puts his hand on her wrist to stop her.

KYLE
O.K.   Time to go.

MIRANDA
That was a joke.   He got probation.

She carefully inserts the slim jim between the car window and the door.  She moves it 
around expertly, and after a few seconds the door lock clicks.   Kyle jumps.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Give me the tape.

Kyle hands her the tape.  She opens the car door.   As soon as she raises the handle,  the 
car alarm goes off.

KYLE
Shit.    Letís go.

MIRANDA
Wait.   Let me put the tape in.

She sits in the driverís seat and popís the tape in the car radio.

KYLE
Take that out.   It has my name on it.

Miranda rolls her eyes at him.

MIRANDA
How else is she going to know whose song
it is?

KYLE
But sheíll know I broke into her car.

MIRANDA
Of course she will.   Thatís the one
drawback to the plan.

KYLE
I canít believe I didnít think of that.

The alarm continues to blare.  A light comes on inside the house.  Kyle looks up and 
sees it.  Miranda follows his gaze and sees it too.

MIRANDA
Donít people ignore these things anymore?

She gets out of the car.   Kyle gets in a pushes buttons on the tape player.

KYLE
Whereís the eject?

Miranda hears something;  she looks down the driveway and sees a police car pulling 
up.

MIRANDA
And when did the cops start responding so
quickly?

INT.  POLICE STATION - MORNING

Kyle sits in one of a row of chairs against the wall.  He looks angry.  Miranda leans over 
the receiving desk,  pleasing with an unsympathetic cop.

MIRANDA
I  told you,  we werenít trying to steal
anything.  We were giving her a tape.

KYLE
	(weary)
Donít arrest her.   It was my idea.

MIRANDA
It was my idea.

The cop looks from one to the other;   he doesnít care whose idea it was.

KYLE
At least you admit that.

MIRANDA
Why are you mad at me?  You agreed  to it.

KYLE
You didnít mention the one drawback.

MIRANDA
Any idiot would have figured out the one the one
drawback.

WYNONNA JUDD walks into the police station,  a police officer at her side.  Everyone 
turns to look at her.  The unsympathetic desk cop seems particularly impressed to see 
her.

POLICEMAN
. . . and my daughter just loves your last
album.   I like that one you did with your
mama . . .
	(singing)
ďGirls night out, honey there ainít no
doubt . . . Ē

He notices everyone looking at him and stops singing.   He points at Kyle and Miranda.

POLICMAN  (CONTíD)
These here are your perpetrators.

Kyle extends his right hand.

KYLE
Hi.     Kyle Davidson.   Itís a pleasure to
meet you.

Wynonna shakes his hand.   Miranda looks at him like heís nuts.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
This is Miranda Presley.

MIRANDA
Hi.

WYNONNA
Kind of polite for hardened criminals.
Which one of you jimmied open my car door?

Miranda raises her hand.  The cop behind the counter stops staring at Wynonna and 
rushes over to a desk.   He starts rummaging through drawers.

KYLE
We werenít trying to steal it . . .

WYNONNA
	(to Miranda)
Thanks for not scratching it.   Youíre the 
one singing on the tape?

MIRANDA
	(nods)
Itís his song.  You listened to the tape?

WYNONNA
	(to Kyle)
I guess this song is available?   Or are
you waiting to hear from everyone else
whose car  you broke into?

KYLE
Yours was the only car we broke into


WYNONNA
Well,  Iím flattered.  I just wish I wasnít
flattered this early in the morning.   Is
your phone number on the tape?

Kyle nods,  embarrassed at his stupidity.

WYNONNA  (CONTíD)
Iíll have my manager give you a call about
putting it on hold.

Kyleís mouth drops open.  Miranda smiles.  Wynonna turns to leave the police station.

POLICEMAN
Miss Judd?   Do you want to press charges?

WYNONNA
All I want is to get some sleep.

KYLE
	(to Miranda)
Donít think this means I forgive you.

The copy going through his desk finds what heís looking for.  He holds up a tape, 
triumphantly,  looks up and sees Wynonna leaving.

POLICEMAN  #2
Excuse me,  Miss Judd?

She turns to look at him.   He hurries to catch up with her.

POLICEMAN  #2
Since youíre looking for new material. . .

He offers her the tape.  She takes it from him patiently, promising to listen to it.

INT.  COFFEE SHOP - NIGHT

Miranda sits in her usual booth, but this time sheís awake.  She has her guitar next to 
her and her notebook open in front of her, trying to write a song.   It doesnít seem to be 
going too well,  most of what sheís written has been crossed out.  She reads what she 
still ahs and crosses that out too.

INT.  JAMESí TRUCK - AFTERNOON

Miranda and James are in the truck.  Miranda drives.

MIRANDA
Iím having trouble even getting started.
Maybe I canít do it.

JAMES
You learned how to drive two weeks ago and
youíre already the best driver I know.

MIRANDA
Writing songs is different.

JAMES
Maybe you need to try it with your eyes
closed.

She looks at him and shakes her head, swerving expertly around a car at the same time.

MIRANDA
Tried it.   Didnít work.

JAMES
Whenís your night off?

MIRANDA
Wednesday.

JAMES
Wednesday.  Iíll show you a few tricks.
But you have to promise not to get better 
than me.

Miranda pulls into the parking lot for Lucyís.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - AFTERNOON

The cafť hasnít opened yet.   Miranda opens the door, showing up for work.  James is 
with her; they kiss goodbye passionately.  Lucy looks at them disapproving.  Miranda 
comes in and ties an apron around her waist.  Lucy puts glasses away behind the bar.  
Nick is onstage, doing a sound check for his performance later.

NICK
(into microphone)
Check,  check.   Lucy . . . Lucy?   Is this
working right?

Lucy finally looks up.

LUCY
The microphone is fine, Nick.

NICK
Youíre pretty fine,  yourself,  Lucy.

Lucy goes back to work.  Miranda smiles.

MIRANDA
Can I ask you something?

LUCY
If you think thereís something you donít
already know.

MIRANDA
How long has he been after you like this?

LUCY
A little over a year.

In the background,  Nick starts to strum his guitar.

MIRANDA
And youíve never even gone out with him?

NICK
	(singing)
She wonít even give me a chance. . .

Lucy sighs; she doesnít think this is nearly as interesting as Miranda does.

LUCY
I expect youíll keep asking me about this
until you hear the whole sorry story.

Miranda looks at her expectantly.

NICK
	(singing)
She calls me sorry,  and thatís just what I
am . . .

LUCY
I met Nick about. . . eight years ago.   My
husband and him. . .

MIRANDA
Your husband?

Nick starts a new song,  with a different melody.

NICK
	(singing)
That no good man wasnít no good for you. . .

LUCY
My husband played guitar in Nickís band.
Nick started acting pretty much the way he
acts now,  only then I was young and didnít
have much sense.

NICK	(singing)
I wouldnít give you a dollar,    for all the sense
in the world. . .
LUCY
I eventually left my husband and took up
with him

She jerks her head in Nickís direction.

MIRANDA
What happened?

NICK
	(singing)
It was the right love,  at the wrong
time. . .

LUCY
Nick got a record deal.   He cut an album
and went on tour.   His first night on the
road,  he called me up and started talking
about. . . what was it,  Nick?   Space?

NICK
	(singing)
Now it seems all the space in the world,
is between me and you. . . 

LUCY
Well,   his album didnít exactly set any
sales records,  and his record label
dropped him.   Before I knew it he was
hanging around here,  thinking I was fool
enough to take him back.

NICK
	(singing)
You donít want to fool,  with this fool in
love with you. . .

MIRANDA
Maybe heís learned his lesson.

NICK
	(singing)
But Iíve learned my lesson,  you taught me
the hard way to fall. . .

LUCY
He hasnít said anything so far to make me
think heís learned one damn thing.  Iím
going to open up.

She walks over to unlock the front door.

NICK
	(singing)
Open up your heart to me,  darling,  this
time I wonít let you down.

LUCY
Get off my stage, Nick.

EXT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

Mirandaís just getting off work.  She comes outside and looks around for something.  
She sees Kyle,  leaning against his truck.  Miranda stays where she is.  Kyle walks over 
to her.

KYLE
I told Linda Lue Iíd pick you up.   I
thought we might celebrate.

She looks at him doubtfully.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
Any idiot would have figured out the one drawback.
Miranda smiles.

EXT.  SIDEWALK - NIGHT

Miranda and Kyle walk along the strip on night clubs and souvenir shops.  Itís a warm 
night, and they pass musicians playing on the sidewalk for tips.  They pass an open 
bottle of champagne back and forth,  drinking straight out of the bottle.

KYLE
Itís lucky for both of us that my song was
so good,  or weíd be in jail right now.

MIRANDA
Itís lucky for you that I sang on that
demo.

KYLE
Hey,   I can sing pretty good,  Iíll have you
know.

MIRANDA
Youíll have to show me that sometime.

Kyle walks over to one of the street musicians and borrows his guitar.  He leans against 
a wall and begins to play; Miranda and the musician watch him.  He starts to sing;  itís 
the love song he did at the auditions,  the one Miranda sang to him in the parking lot.  
Kyle does it a lot better than when he auditioned; he looks right a Miranda and sings the 
words to her.  He finishes, showing no signs of embarrassment,  and hands the guitar 
back to the musician.

KYLE
Thanks,  buddy.

He and Miranda walk away.

MIRANDA
Not bad.

She hands him the champagne bottle.

KYLE
Not bad?   Not bad!

MIRANDA
Youíre Johnny Cash.   Youíre Vince Gill.
Youíre George Strait.

He puts his arm around her,  and she leans her head against his shoulder.

KYLE
You know whatís funny?

Miranda doesnít answer.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
The first time I saw you,  I didnít even
realize how beautiful you were.

She seems affected by this, but only for a moment.  She pulls away from him.

MIRANDA
Just once,  Iíd like a sober man to call me
beautiful.

KYLE
Itís not just that,  itís you.     I didnít
even care that I got arrested,  really,
because I was with you.  You know how I
got better at that song?

Mirandaís look says she doesnít want to know.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
I thought about you.   About everything I
wanted to tell you about how I feel.   And
I was sober at the time,  I promise.

Kyle moves toward her.  She moves away,  starts walking again, trying to lighten the 
mood.

MIRANDA
So you realize thereís a song for
everything that happens in life?
Sometimes there are dozens for one moment
in time,  like now.   Yours could be that
REO Speedwagon song about wanting to be
more than friends,  and mine could be ďBaby
donít get hooked on me.Ē

KYLE
Iíve always hated that song.

MIRANDA
I got you arrested and Iíll always remind
you of a song that you hate.   That should
be two strike against me.

KYLE
Donít count on it.

INT.  AIRPORT TERMINAL - NIGHT

James and Miranda come up to a gate, carrying their guitars.  James walks up to the 
window and watches a plan taxi up to the gate.  Miranda plops down in a chair.

MIRANDA
I think youíre mistaken about how easy it
is to amuse me.    Itís harder than this.

James walks over and sits next to her.   He takes out his guitar.

JAMES
Weíre not here to amuse you,  weíre her to
get you some inspiration.   Look at him.

He points at an old man carrying a small bunch of daisies.  The man stands looking 
expectantly at the gate.  Miranda looks at him, unimpressed.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Waiting for his wife.   The woman he
married when she was barely seventeen.
The woman he loves just as much today as
the day he met her.

MIRANDA
You could write a song from that?

JAMES
No.   Not me.   I donít write about
everlasting love.

MIRANDA
Say heís waiting for Gregor,  his thirty-
year-old Dutch lover.  They met in Venice
last Valentineís day,   and have been apart
since then.

JAMES
How  come?

MIRANDA
Howard over there had to have his wife
killed,  and her collection of exotic
parrots converted into hatbands.

JAMES
Should be a touching reunion.   Not a
country song,  though.  What about him?

James points at a man,  about 35,  who looks anxiously out the window at the plane.

MIRANDA
He married his high school sweetheart,
they have a lovely home and a wonderful
marriage,  or so everyone think.   Sheís
returning from a Mary Kay convention.

JAMES
Or so she says.   That has possibilities.

He plays a few chords and sings a line about the American Dream gone wrong.

The door opens and passengers start coming into the gate area.  The old man searches 
each face,  almost as if heís frightened.  Suddenly his face lights up.  A short blue-eyed 
woman comes to him,  her smile just like his.   He holds her tightly,  his fist clenching 
the daisies behind her back.   Nearby,  a young couple kisses passionately.

James looks at Miranda;  he told her so.   Miranda stars at the old couple,  who break 
apart as if slightly embarrassed.   The man picks up the womanís bags.  Heís forgotten 
to give her the flowers.  The young couple continues to kiss.

The man who was looking out the window is standing on the edge of the crowd of 
passengers,  searching for someone.

JAMES
Watch him.

Finally the man sees who he heís looking for;  a five-year-old girl gets off the plane, 
holding the stewardessí hand.   The little girl sees him and breaks free of the stewardess.  
She yells  ďDaddy!Ē  and runs to her father, who kneels down and catches her, lifting her 
in his arms.  She wraps her little legs around him and hugs his neck tightly; you couldnít 
find an inch of space between them.

The father closes his eyes for a moment, smiling.

James looks at Miranda,  who stares at the father and daughter.  She looks like sheís 
about to cry.  She turns away,  embarrassed.

MIRANDA
Letís go.

She picks up her guitar and walks quickly away from the crowded gate,  down the 
corridor.  James hurries to catch up with her.

JAMES
Whatís the matter?

MIRANDA
Nothing.

JAMES
O.K.   You donít have to tell me.

Miranda steps at an empty waiting area and takes a seat.   James sits next to her.

MIRANDA
I hate that.   Someone goes away for two
weeks and itís like the end of the fucking
world.

JAMES
Whatís wrong with missing someone?

MIRANDA
If you know theyíre coming back, you have
no right to miss them.   Itís not like
theyíre dead.

They sit there a little while,  James sensing that Mirandaís really upset about something.

JAMES
I remember when my grandfather died. I
kept waiting for him to come to Sunday
dinner.

MIRANDA
How old were you?

JAMES
Twenty.

Miranda looks at him, a little surprised.   She hesitates, then opens her locket and shows 
him inside.

MIRANDA
Thatís my dad.

One side has a black and white photo of her father,  a handsome man with a wide grin.   
The other side has a black and white photo of Elvis pouting.   James tries a little joke.

JAMES
He looks just like Elvis.

MIRANDA
That is Elvis.   He gave me this when I was
ten.  My  decitennial accolade,  he called
it.   He raised me since I was five.   Just
me and him.

She looks at the pictures,  then snaps the locket shut drops it around her neck.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Presleyís my middle name.   He had this
kind of Elvis thing.   Nothing weird.

JAMES
When did he die?

MIRANDA
Three months ago.

JAMES
Thatís not very long.   Itís only natural
that you miss him.

MIRANDA
I donít miss him.   He told me not to.

Mirandaís quiet.   James just sits with her,  comfortable with the silence.

JAMES
You want to go?

MIRANDA
O.K.

EXT.  MOTEL POOL - NIGHT

James sits in a deck chair.  Miranda sits on the diving board, dangling her toes in the 
water.   Itís a hot summer night; she wears a t-shirt and shorts.  She has her guitar, and 
is singing ďBad MedicineĒ, which sheís transformed from pop/metal to country.  She 
does the first verse,  then:

MIRANDA
When I get married,   Iím going to have them
play  ďBad MedicineĒ as I walk down the
aisle.   The Bon Jovi version.

Miranda climbs off the diving board and sets her guitar in a chair.  She goes over to the 
pool stops and starts to climb in fully dressed.

James starts to play something; itís the song he started writing earlier,  in the airport,  
about living the American dream, but only on the surface.  He has a few really good 
lines.  By the heís done,  Miranda has gotten all the way into the pool,  except for her 
head.  Sheís been watching him intently the whole time heís been singing.  James puts 
down his guitar and sits at the edge of the pool.

JAMES
Why do you always stay up all night?

MIRANDA
Linda Lue snores.

JAMES
Are you afraid of the dark?

MIRANDA
If I was afraid on the dark,  I wouldnít
spend so much time in the dark,  would I?

James pulls off his shirt and starts to climb into the pool.  Miranda ducks underwater 
and comes back up.

JAMES
Nightmares?

MIRANDA
Not since I was eight.

JAMES
Whatíd you do then,  when you a
nightmare?

MIRANDA
I would wake up my dad, heíd come get me,
and heíd let me stay up all night.  Weíd
light candles and make cookies and play
poker.   We used to crank call foreign
countries.   I learned the twist at four in
the morning.   Then when it got light out,
Iíd go to bed and miss half a day of 
school.   My dad once wrote a not for me;
ďMiranda was unavoidably late to school
today due to a slight pterodactyl crisis
at home.  The problem has been remedied
and it is unlikely that this will happen
again.Ē

They move around the shallow end of the pool,  not approaching each other.

JAMES
So youíve been sleeping during the day
since he died?

MIRANDA
At first,  I couldnít sleep at all,  then
the only time I could even remember what
he looked like was in the middle of the
night.   I sometimes think about what Iíll
say when I see him again,  and if Iíll
recognize him,  then I realize I wonít see
him again at all.

James moves over to Miranda and stands in front of her.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Iíve been thinking about something. (He
takes her hands.)

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
I wonder if Iíll know you in a year.

JAMES
I donít know.

James moves toward her,  trying to seduce her.   Itís not clear if sheís going to respond.

MIRANDA
If we go out, and we break up,  I probably
wonít.  Iíll be just another girl you used
to go out with.  And someday thereíll be
so many you wonít know which one I was.

James backs away from her.

JAMES
You want me to say weíll be together in a
year?   Because I canít say that.

MIRANDA
No.    Thatís not what I want.

A look of realization crosses his face.   He lets go of her hands.

JAMES
You donít want to do this.

MIRANDA
I donít think itís a good idea.

James gets out of the pool; heís angry and heís leaving.  He picks up his shirt and starts 
to walk away,  then stops and turns to Miranda.

JAMES
Iím going to have to ask you to tell me
why.

MIRANDA
I told you.

JAMES
I need the real reason.  Then weíll be
friends or whatever it is you want.

Miranda sits on the top step on the pool.  She looks away from him an tells him the 
truth.

MIRANDA
Iíve been trying to write a song.   Just
one song,  to prove I can do it.  Not even
a good song.  And you,  you see two
strangers at an airport and you turn it
into something so. . . incredible.   Your
song was incredible.

JAMES
What,   youíre jealous?  I might not even
finish that song.    I have a song I started
three years ago thatís not done yet.

MIRANDA
Iím not jealous.   Iím overwhelmed.   I just
canít give you that,  see?

JAMES
I donít care.

MIRANDA
I do.

She stares at him.  He sees sheís set on this and gives up, walking away.  She sits in the 
pool, holding her knees to her chest, watching him go.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

Later that night.  The performances are over, and only a few songwriters hang around,  
making arrangements to get together and write.   Miranda puts the last chair up.  She 
goes over to Lucy,  whoís counting receipts at one of the tables.

LUCY
You can leave if you want, honey.

Miranda sits with her.

MIRANDA
Lucy,  do you think anyone can be a 
songwriter


LUCY
Iíve seen some people who tried about as
hard as a person can try and just never
get it,  you know?   I donít think you can
learn it.   I canít do it.

Miranda looks discouraged.

LUCY  (CONTíD)
I didnít mean to bring you down.

              MIRANDA
I always thought I wanted to be a singer,
then I came hear and realized I like to
sing,  but it doesnít seem like enough.
But songwritingís so different; I just
donít know if itís worth it to try.  It
comes so easily to some people,  like
James.

LUCY
You know whatís in this case?

She points to the glass case on the wall behind her,  which contains tacked-up papers 
with handwriting on them:  pages torn from notebooks,  cocktail napkins,  an air-
sickness bag.   Miranda looks and shakes her head no.  Lucy stand up and examines the 
writing.

LUCY  (CONTíD)
These are all songs,  by my songwriters.
Theyíre not all hits, but theyíre special
songs.   ďLike a miracle, some golden words
roll off of someoneís tongue.Ē  Some of
the took ten minutes, some if them took
years.   Every one of these songwriters
would tell you itís worth it.   You write a
song like one of these,  and you canít ever
give up again.  You know what it feels
 like to be special,  and thereís nothing
and no one that can give you that same
kind of special.

Lucy sits back down to get back to work.

LUCY  (CONTíD)
Thatís why I worry about you,  being with
James.

MIRANDA
James and I decided weíd just be friends.

Lucy nods.

LUCY
It doesnít matter how wonderful he is if
heís only going to break you heart.

MIRANDA
Yeah,  thatís what I decided.  Iíll see you
tomorrow.

LUCY
Goodnight,  honey.

Miranda leaves.   Nickís standing nearby.   He watches her go.

INT.  ROADHOUSE - NIGHT

James is onstage,  singing.   Thereís a band behind him.  Some people are dancing down 
front; Linda Lue is among them.   Miranda enters and finds Kyle sitting down front.  
She sits with him.  James sees her come in and smiles at her.

MIRANDA
Howís he doing?

Kyle hesitates,  then answers sincerely,

KYLE
Great.

Linda Lue returns,  flushed,  from the dance floor.

LINDA LUE
Hey,  good,  you made it.  Come and dance.
This old stick-in-the-mud
	(points to Kyle)
hasnít danced with me once.

KYLE
	(to Miranda)
Who knew she was such a party girl?

MIRANDA
Do you know how to do that?

She gestures toward the dance floor,  where theyíre doing an elaborate country step.

KYLE
Sure.

MIRANDA
Come on and show me how.

He hesitates only a moment before getting up and escorting Miranda and Linda Lue to 
the dance floor.

INT.  ROADHOUSE - NIGHT

Miranda,  Kyle and Linda Lue are on the dance floor.   Linda Lue and Kyle are expertly 
performing the steps.  Linda Lue smiles flirtatiously at the guy next to her; she seems to 
be in her element.  Miranda stands in between them, trying to follow.  She smacks Linda 
Lue on the arm to get her attention away from the cowboy.  Linda Lue does it slowly to 
demonstrate, then smiles and nods when Miranda gets it right.

We watch the dancing for awhile - a dance floor full of people performing intricate steps 
in rapid, perfect unison, having the time of their lives.

INT.  ROADHOUSE - NIGHT

James finishes a song.  Miranda,  Kyle  and Linda Lue are still on the dance floor.  They 
stand and applaud.

JAMES
O.K.  Thank you.  Weíre going to do one
more for you all tonight.   Iíve got a
special guest singer on this number.

He looks straight and Miranda and smiles.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Her nameís Miranda Presley and I think
youíre gonna like her.

Miranda just stands there,  disbelieving.

LINDA LUE
Go on up,  Miranda.

JAMES
Miranda,  get on up here.

Miranda shakes her head.  The other band members lean into their microphones and 
chorus her name, taunting her.  She smiles and climbs onstage.  The band starts the 
song.  James takes off his guitar; he takes her hand and speaks into her ear.

JAMES
You know this one.

Miranda realized theyíre playing ďHooked on a feelingĒ.  She laughs.  The bassist hands 
her a microphone.  James starts to sing,  then Miranda comes in, grinning,  not nervous 
at all once she starts to sing.  We havenít heard the song quite like this before; the 
sound couldnít be more country.  Theyíre both having a good time.

Couples start to dance.  Linda Lue watches, standing still among the dancers,  smiling 
like a sentimental fool.

Kyle stares at James and Miranda,  his expression serious, his broken heart on his 
sleeve.

The song ends and the audience applauds enthusiastically.  James hugs Miranda.

EXT.  ROADHOUSE  PARKING LOT- NIGHT

James, Miranda, Linda Lue, and Kyle come out into the parking lot.  James holds a 
business card in his hands.

JAMES
	(to Kyle)
Do you know this guy?  Doug Roberts?

KYLE
Yeah.   Heís a good manager,  been around
for twenty years.  He has a good
reputation.

JAMES
He wants to do some master demos with me.

KYLE
Thatís great.   He can get you a record
deal.   Congratulations.

JAMES
Thanks.

MIRANDA
Congratulations.

JAMES
Come here a minute.

He takes Mirandaís hand and pulls her over to his truck.   He looks into her eyes.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Do you have the feeling that no matter how
conclusively we decide not to be attracted
to each other,  forces beyond our control
will pull us together?

He moves slowly toward Miranda.

MIRANDA
You think the entire universe is
controlled by magnets,  donít you?

JAMES
Yes and no.

Heís standing right next to her now,  and sheís not moving away.

MIRANDA
What was the question?

He kisses her.    She doesnít resist.

INT.  JAMESí BEDROOM - NIGHT

A country love song plays on the stereo.  James leads Miranda by one hand into the 
darkened bedroom.   Miranda chatters nervously.

MIRANDA
Weíve been thinking about moving out of
the motel,  but we donít have any
furniture,  and the dog seems to like it,
and they wrap the glasses in cellophane,
even though Lou always washes them again
before she lets me drink out of them.

Theyíre standing at the foot of the bed.

JAMES
I need for you to shut up now.

MIRANDA
Why?

JAMES
Iím trying to picture you as Earlene
Mandrell,  and you donít sound a think like
her.

MIRANDA
Well,  lucky for me,  you sound exactly like
Jim Nabors.

JAMES
I really need for you to shut up now.

He kisses her on the neck and unbuttons her shirt.  She responds, undoing his belt 
buckle.  They fall onto the bed and continue to make love.

INT.  JAMESí BEDROOM - NIGHT

Later that night.   James wakes up and looks around.  He notices Miranda is gone, then 
hears music from another room.  He gets up.

INT.  JAMESí KITCHEN - NIGHT

Miranda sits at the kitchen table,  quietly playing guitar,  wearing a loose denim shirt 
that must be Jamesí.  Her notebook is open in front of her and she writes something 
down,  then looks up and sees James standing in the doorway.


JAMES
Maybe Iíll start staying up all night.
The best things in my life happen after
dark.
He passes by her,  pulling back her shirt to kiss her shoulder,  and sits at the table.  She 
keeps playing quietly.

MIRANDA
Lucy told me youíd break my heart.

JAMES
I guess you didnít believe her.

MIRANDA
Maybe I just decided to risk it.

JAMES
Howís your song coming?

MIRANDA
I have one line.

JAMES
Every song starts with one line.

MIRANDA
I donít know if itís any good.  My dad
always said I could do anything.  I keep
thinking about this song he wrote for me.

JAMES
Do you remember it?
She nods.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Let me hear it.

Miranda plays the song.  The lyrics are about a fatherís unending devotion to his 
daughter.  She stops after the first chorus.

JAMES
Thatís a nice line, about falling out of
the sky and landing in love.

Heís hesitant,  like heís searching for something nice to say.

MIRANDA
Is that the only thing you liked?

JAMES
Itís just. . . well,  devotion is a tricky
theme.   Of course a parentís devoted to
his child.  You have to have a point of
		(CONTíD

JAMES  (CONTíD)
view.   Like he wants a better life for you
than he had for himself.   This song starts
at the end of the story.

MIRANDA
Every song doesnít have to be about
something you can relate to.

JAMES
A good song has something to say,  even to
people who havenít been in that situation.

MIRANDA
	(hurt)
So itís not a good song,  because you donít
like it.

JAMES
Iím just telling you what I thought.   Iíve
spent half my life writing songs,  I know
something about it.   I thought you were
trying to learn.

She stands up.

MIRANDA
If you had thought about it,  you would
have realized this wasnít a good example.

She picks up her notebook and walks out of the kitchen.   James looks like heís 
realizing his mistake.

INT.  MOTEL ROOM - DAY

Miranda has decorated her half of the room;  there are photos of Lyle Lovett and Jon 
Bon Jovi over her bed.

Miranda sits in her bed, the dog on her lap.  She looks terrible.  She rummages through 
the drawer of her nightstand and pulls out a cassette.  She puts it in the player on top of 
the nightstand and presses play.  We hear a manís voice,  speaking.

VOICE
And I gave Fish-head four gallons of ice
cream for dinner,  just like you said.  Of
was that supposed to be one can of cat 
food?  I couldnít remember,  and Fish-head
insists that she always has ice cream on 
Thursday.  She also said to tell you she
misses you, and she caught a giant spider
that I thought looked a lot like that
Billy Warren kid you think is so cute.  I 
told her youíd be home soon.  Remember,  if
you get homesick,  just keep your chin up. . .

Miranda hits the fast-forward button.  When she hits play again, we hear her father 
singing,  the same song she played for James. We hear the second verse this time.  
Miranda is visibly upset.  She raises her chin;  apparently she takes that literally.  She 
doesnít cry.  She hits the stop button,  her chin still in the air.  She reaches for her 
notebook and opens it.

EXT.  RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD - NIGHT

Kyleís pick-up pulls up outside a house.   He and Miranda get out.

MIRANDA
How many people will be here?

KYLE
Five or six.   Everyone just plays
something theyíre working on.   Donít
worry,  no oneís going to insult your song.
Theyíll only say what they like about it.

MIRANDA
What if they donít say anything?

KYLE
There are so many things a person can do
with her life.   That girl in ďFlashdanceĒ
was a welder.

MIRANDA
Do you think theyíll notice if I play
ĎLiviní on a PrayerĒ?

INT.  NICKíS HOUSE - NIGHT

Kyle and Miranda sit in Nickís kitchen,  with Nick and three other
musicians,  KEVIN,  ERICA, and JOE.  Theyíre sitting in a circle
around the small kitchen table.  Thereís a tape recorder on the table.  Everyone has a 
beer and one or two of the guys smoke cigarettes.   Erica has the only guitar in the 
room, and she sings a song,  substituting laís for one of the lines.  Kevin sings a line she 
might use there.  Erica sings it back,  changing a few words.

CUT TO:

Later that night.   Nick has the guitar now,  and he sings a song thatís 
uncharacteristically sober for him.  Itís an apology to a woman he betrayed; he admits 
that he had no excuse to hurt her.  The tape recorder is on, recording Nickís 
performance.  Miranda watches him intently.

CUT TO:

Everyoneís laughing.  It must be getting late,  because theyíre getting a little giddy.  Joe 
sings a song about how broke he is and they all join in the chorus

CUT TO:

Miranda takes the guitar from Kyle and begins to play her song.  Sheís a little shy about 
it but manages to perform pretty well.  Her song isnít bad;  it has a nice melody,  but the  
lyrics are not especially moving.  All she has is the first verse.

MIRANDA
I donít like that last line.

ERICA
No.    Keep that one.   I like that line.

MIRANDA
Iím not sure what it means.

NICK
If you wrote it,  youíll figure out what it
means eventually.   Thatís the best line in
your song.

Miranda isnít sure if she agrees with them.

INT.  LAUNDROMAT - NIGHT

Linda Lue folds laundry while Miranda sits cross-legged on to of a table, playing her 
guitar.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

After the bar has closed,  Miranda sits at the bar,  playing her song for Nick.

INT.  MOTEL ROOM - MORNING

Miranda sits cross-legged on her bed,  her notebook open on her lap.  Linda Lueís bed 
is neatly made.   Linda Lue emerges from the shower.

LINDA LUE
Oh good,  you got in.   Are you coming to 
the audition today?

MIRANDA
I donít know.   I donít think my song is
ready.

LINDA LUE
Has it changed any in the last two weeks?

MIRANDA
Yeah,  but I changed it back.

Linda Lue looks at her.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Fine.    Iíll go.

Linda Lue smiles.  She sits in front of the mirror and proceeds to examine every inch of 
her face, looking for wrinkles.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
What are you looking for?

LINDA LUE
Signs of aging.

MIRANDA
Find any?

LINDA LUE
Well,  I like Barry Manilow more than I
used to.  You know what I donít get?

MIRANDA
What?

LINDA LUE
You and James.   You have one little spat
and you donít call him and he doesnít call
you.

MIRANDA
I guess we both realized our mistake.

LINDA LUE
I thought you really liked him

MIRANDA
That was the mistake.

Miranda gets under the covers.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Wake me up for the audition.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - DAY
The weekly audition is in progress.   Miranda and Linda Lue share a table.   Nick sits at 
the bar.  Lucy sits at her usual table in back.  Kyle is onstage,  doing a nice job with one 
of the songs weíve heard before.  He finishes triumphantly,  breathes a sigh of relief,  
and walks back to the table.

LUCY
Miranda Presley.

Miranda takes the stage.  She introduces herself quickly and sings the song she sang at 
Nickís house.  Sheís left in the line that the other musicians liked.  Itís the most 
evocative line in the song,  and it seems out of place with the rest of the lyrics.  Luc

watches Miranda with a small smile on her face; sheís impressed that Miranda is taking 
this seriously.

We see now that James is standing just inside the door; he must have been there since 
before Miranda started playing.

LUCY
Linda Lue Linden,  go on up and show us
your stuff,  honey.

Miranda passes Linda Lue on her way back.  They exchange smiles.  Linda Lue takes 
the stage.

LINDA LUE
Hi there.   Iím Linda Lue,  from Alabama.
This song is called  ďI went looking for
Jesus.Ē

Linda Lue begins to sing;  her song is about misprinted Bibles, and,  true to her style,  
itís unrelentingly cute.    Miranda glances at Lucy to get her reaction,  but is unable to 
read her expression.

James walks over and sits next to Miranda.   Sheís surprised to see him.  Kyle isnít 
happy to see him.  They speak in low voices.

JAMES
I like you song.

MIRANDA
	(cold)
Thanks.

JAMES
Iíve missed you.

Kyle doesnít have any choice but to leave.   He makes a fist and presses it firmly against 
the table as he gets up.

MIRANDA
Since my phone still ainít ringiní, I
assume it still ainít you.

JAMES
Iím sorry I didnít call.  I couldnít call
you,  I donít now.   That night, after we
made love. . .

Mirandaís eyes widen;  she looks around as if someone might have heard.

JAMES  (CONTíD)

Well,  we did.   And then I was a jerk.   I
should have just kept my mouth shut.   Iím
sorry.   I should have told you then. . .

MIRANDA
Look,  it wasnít that big a deal.   Youíve
apologized.  Letís forget it,  O.K.?

She glanced over at Lucy,  who glares at her to be quiet while Linda Lue is singing.

JAMES
It wasnít just my fault,  you know.

Miranda looks at him questioningly.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
You said you were willing to risk it,  but
you werenít.

Miranda shakes her head no,  agreeing with him.

MIRANDA
Iím sorry.

She means sheís still not willing.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
I should have told you that night. . .

Lucy appears behind them and shushes him.   They look at her guiltily.  She leaves.  
James reaches for Mirandaís hand.  Sheís reluctant to give it to him,  but he gives her a 
pleading look and gently takes her hand, placing it palm up in his left hand.  With his 
right,  he spells something onto her hand with his finger.  When she realized what the 
message is,  she turns and watches him finish spelling.  He looks into her eyes.  She 
closes her hand into a fist,  turns away, and pulls it under her other arm,  hugging 
herself.  She watches Linda Lue finishing up her song.   James,  recognizing the impact 
his message had, reaches across Miranda to take her hand again.  She lets him take it in 
his.  James smiles.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - DAY

Lucy announces the results of the audition.  She calls out Kyleís name; he passed this 
time.  Linda Lue lets out a whoop and hugs him.  Miranda smiles too.

Lucy get to the end of the list.  Linda Lue wasnít on it; neither was Miranda.  Linda Lue 
looks disappointed.  Miranda takes the news well.

JAMES
You should have passed.

Miranda shakes her head.

MIRANDA
I knew it wasnít ready.   I can do it
better.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

Later that day,  after the auditions are over,  Miranda has shown up for work and is 
tying on an apron around her waist.   Lucy comes in.   Miranda smiles at her,  showing 
her sheís not angry about the audition.

LUCY
Hey,  I thought you did real good today.

MIRANDA
Youíre supposed to pass the ones you like.

LUCY
You know why I bought my own place?

MIRANDA
So you could play God.

LUCY
Thatís exactly right, honey.   I think you
got a real good start,  but I wouldnít be
doing you any favors if I let you play
this soon.

MIRANDA
Oh,   I brought you something.

Miranda holds out a cassette .   Lucy takes it.

LUCY
Whatís this?

MIRANDA
If I tell you to just trust me and listen
to this,  will you?

Lucy shakes her head.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Itís Nick,  a song of his.   I think you
should hear it.
	(smiles)
Itís all about you.   And it wonít get any
laughs.

Lucy sets the tape on the counter.  Miranda wonít take it back;
she walks away.  Lucy looks at the tape.

EXT.  PLAYGROUND - DAY

Miranda and Linda Lue are taking the dog for a walk.   Miranda holds a flyer 
advertising the Miss Nashville pageant.

LINDA LUE
And thereís prizes,  and scholarships,  and
the winner goes to the Miss Tennessee
pageant.

They come up to a playground.

MIRANDA
I hope you wonít be insulted if I tell you
I already think of you as Miss Nashville.
What about your illustrious songwriting
career?

They come up to the slide.   Miranda picks up the dog and carries him to the top of the 
slide.

LINDA LUE
You have no way of knowing this,  since you
are asleep during most of my waking hours,
but I have been having serious doubts
about my future as a songwriter,  which has
been my one goal since I was eleven years
old and saw ďCoal Minerís DaughterĒ for
the first time.

Miranda places the dog at the top of the slide and hold him steady,  facing towards the 
drop.  The dog starts to wiggle eagerly and she lets him go.  He slides to the bottom, 
where Linda Lue catches him and carries him around to do it again.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
But lately Iíve been thinking about
something my late grandmother Tilly use
to say.   She would say,  ĎLook at your
breakfast.  Youíve got your bacon,  and
your eggs.   Now, the hen was involved in
your breakfast,  but that hog was 
committed.Ē

Linda Lue releases the dog down the slide to Miranda.   They continue to take turns 
putting the dog down the slide.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
Lately Iíve been feeling more like that
hen.   If I thought I could really do it,
that might be another story.

MIRANDA
The pageantís next week?  Do you have time
to get ready?  Donít people train for
months for these things?

LINDA LUE
Miranda,  I believe it is within my ability
to learn to walk in high heel,  discuss  (CONTíD)

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
the role of the woman in todayís society,
and tease my hair in one week.

MIRANDA
If you could have one wish for todayís
children,  what would it be?

LINDA LUE
World peace.   No,  clean air.

MIRANDA
You wouldnít want them to be sick,  or go
hungry,  would you?

LINDA LUE
What do I care?  I hate kids.

MIRANDA
Youíre beautiful and queen-like,  Lou.
Youíre a beauty queen.   Youíve got this
locked up.

INT.  RECORDING STUDIO - DAY

James is in the recording studio with a band of session musicians.  DOUG ROBERTS,  
the manager who gave James his card at the Roadhouse,  sits in the booth with the 
engineer.  The musicians are all in their thirties and forties; most of them look like 
somebodyís father.  Theyíre doing one of the songs weíve heard James do before, but 
this version seems to lack energy.  James is clearly dissatisfied with the way things are 
going,  but is trying to be patient.   He stops singing in the middle of the song and cuts 
the band.

JAMES
We need to bring up the snares.

DOUG
	(over microphone)
They sound fine in here.

JAMES
This tempoís all wrong.

DOUG
Donít worry.   It sounds great.

JAMES
Iím not deaf.   I can tell how it sounds.

From the way he says this,  we know he hates the way it sounds.

DOUG
Weíll just get it down once this way,  o.k.
James?

JAMES
No.   Thatís not the way I wrote it.

James looks determined.  Doug leaves the booth and comes into the studio to talk some 
sense into James.  The musicians watch, uninterested.  Theyíve seen this before.

DOUG
James,  I know you feel strongly about your
song.  You should,  itís your baby.   But
Iíve been doing this since you were a 
baby.   I know what a hit sounds like.

Dougís matter is soothing,   condescending.

JAMES
I know what shit sounds like.

DOUG
It doesnít sound like shit.   It sounds
like what every country radio station is
looking for.   I have to think in terms of
radio play.

JAMES
I record this the way I wrote it,  or I
donít record it at all.

The musicians start to take notice;  the fight is finally heating up.

DOUG
Iím already taking a big risk with you. . .

JAMES
Donít do me any favors.

He starts to gather up his stuff.

DOUG
Go  ahead.   Walk out.   No one else will
touch you.   Everyone knows about you.

James stands face to face with Doug.

JAMES
What does everyone know about me?

DOUG
Youíve got a hell of an attitude for a
pretty boy with a couple of good songs.

This is just part of Dougís act,  the way he keeps singers in line, but Jamesí anger 
flashes.   Before Doug can see it coming,  James punches him in the eye.

The musicians look at each other,  entertained.   James walks out.

INT.  MOTEL ROOM - DAY

Miranda,  wearing her t-shirt and boxer shorts with a glittery pair of high heels, paces 
the floor with a Bible balanced on her head.

MIRANDA
I pledge allegiance,  to the flag,  of the
United States. . .

Linda Lue calls to her from the bathroom.

LINDA LUE  (O.S.)
I think itís highly unlikely Iíll be
reciting the pledge of allegiance.

Linda Lue sticks her head out the bathroom door,  pulling rollers out of her hair.

LINDA LUE
Much less with a Bible on my head.

Miranda puts her arms straight out at her sides and the Bible falls off her head.

MIRANDA
I would think this is exactly the kind of
thing youíd be doing.  I still think you
should learn that tap dance to ďDixie.Ē
Come on out.

Linda Lue throws open the bathroom door and strikes a pose in the doorway,  one arm 
raised,  head thrown back.  She wears a low-cut sequined gown and heavy make-up and 
has her curled hair piled on top of her head.  Miranda gasps.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Oh,   you look beautiful.

Linda Lue drops the pose and looks down at herself.

LINDA LUE
You think so?    Is it enough?

MIRANDA
Yes.   Itís enough.

LINDA LUE
Itís  not  too  much?

MIRANDA
No.   You look perfect.   Except. . . let me
try one thing.

She reaches up and loosens a few strands of Linda Lueís hair so they fall around her 
face.   Miranda steps back and appraises her work.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Better.    Wait.

Miranda reaches to the dressing table and gets a Q-tip.   She runs the Q-tip under Linda 
Lueís eye,  removing some of the eyeliner,  then does the same for the other eye.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
What did you do,  follow some kind of
eyeliner diagram in the beauty queen
handbook?

LINDA LUE
Iíll be on stage,  I want them to see my
eyes.

MIRANDA
They will see your eyes.   On the other
girls,  all theyíll see is eyeliner.

They turn to face the mirror and look at themselves,  standing side by side.  Linda Lue 
gets a little emotional.

LINDA LUE
Youíre my best friend,  you know.

Mirandaís emotional too,  but embarrassed.   She turns away from the mirror.

MIRANDA
Yeah, well thatís cause youíre such a sap,  Lou.

Linda Lue smiles.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

Itís closing time.   Lucyís behind the bar,  Nick is there at his usual seat.  He gets up to 
leave.

NICK
Goodnight,  Lucy.

LUCY
Goodnight.

NICK
I donít suppose you want to go out with me
tomorrow night.

LUCY
Tomorrow night?

Nick nods.  If heís surprised,  it doesnít show.

LUCY  (CONTíD)
What time?

NICK
Eight oíclock.

LUCY
Eight oíclock.   Thatíll be fine.

NICK
Goodnight,  then.

As he turns to leave,  we see a small smile on his face.

EXT.  ERNEST TUBB RECORD SHOP - NIGHT

A record store with a small outdoor stage behind it, where free ďjamboreesĒ are held at 
night.  Thereís an all-night miniature golf course next door, and Miranda and Linda 
Lueís motel is just across the parking lot.  Itís a warm night, and people are playing 
golf, sitting in the adjacent picnic area or on top of their cars in the parking lot, listening 
to the music.  This is a traditional country music affair;  the band is also made up of 
older musicians, all men,  and includes a banjo an fiddle.

Miranda and Linda Lue sit on top of a picnic table.  James walks up to them

JAMES
Hey.    I got your note.

He holds up a note which reads  ďJames,  JAMBOREE!Ē  with an arrow.

MIRANDA
I never miss a jamboree.

LINDA LUE
Hey,  James.   Howís your career coming?

JAMES
I punched an influential member of the
record industry in the face.

They donít react to the news.

MIRANDA
We know.

JAMES
Again.    Today.

MIRANDA
Oh.    What happened?

JAMES
Iíll tell you on the way.

MIRANDA
On the way where?

JAMES
Itís a surprise.

James takes her hands to help her down off the table.   Miranda says goodbye to Linda 
Lue.

MIRANDA
This had better be better than the
jamboree.

JAMES
It is.

EXT.  HIGHWAY - NIGHT

James and Miranda in Jamesí truck, driving.

MIRANDA
So when do I find out the surprise?

JAMES
There are clues everywhere.   Weíre in a
truck,  on the highway. . . 

MIRANDA
Youíre talking me somewhere.

James points to a road sign.

JAMES
Clue.

MIRANDA
	(reading)
Memphis.   Whatís in Memphis?

James moves his lip in an Elvis sneer.   Miranda screams.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Graceland?   Graceland!   Way cool.

JAMES
You do not know what it is to worship
Elvis until youíve seen his personal shit.

MIRANDA
They should put that on a plaque and hand
it on the gate.
	(singing)
ďGraceland,  Graceland,  Memphis Tennessee.
Weíre going to Graceland. . .Ē

INT.  SUPERMARKET - NIGHT

James and Miranda are at the check-out stand,  buying chee-tos and suzy-qís and Dr. 
Pepper.

MIRANDA
Only six hours to kill.

JAMES
Weíll drive by the gate.  I thought you
would want to see it at night.

They walk out of the supermarket.  James stops by the gumball machines.  He puts a 
quarter in one of the machines and turns the dial.   He looks at the prize,  puts it in his 
jacket pocket, and tries another quarter.  This time he takes the prize out of the plastic 
bubble.  He goes to Miranda and takes the grocery store back from her.   He sets the 
bag on the ground and kneels in front of Miranda.

James takes her left hand and shows her the prize - itís a gold colored ring with a blue 
plastic star.

Miranda looks around,  embarrassed.  The checkers,  two middle-aged women  (one 
white,  one black),  are both watching with smiles on their faces.

MIRANDA
They think youíre proposing.

James doesnít reply.  He tries to put the ring on her ring finger, but it doesnít fit.  He 
puts it on her pinky.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Get up.

James looks over at the checkers.

JAMES
Say  yes  first.

MIRANDA
Yes  to  what?

JAMES
Say  yes,  or  Iíll  look  like a  loser.

MIRANDA
You are kind of a loser.

JAMES
	(loudly)
Say yes.   I canít live without you.

One of the checkers says,  Ďhow romantic.Ē  They ignore a customer trying to buy a six-
pack.

MIRANDA
	(loudly,  angrily)
Yes.   I said yes.   Is that what you want?
Are you happy now?

James acts overjoyed; he smiles gleefully and hugs Miranda.

JAMES
Happy?   Iím the happiest man on earth!

He looks at her and smiles stupidly until she finally has to drop the act and laugh.  They 
grab the groceries and run out of the store,  leaving the checkers bewildered.

EXT.  GRACELAND - NIGHT

Jamesí truck is parked across the street.  James and Miranda sit in the back,  eating 
chee-tos,  looking at the gate.

JAMES
His aunt still lives there.

MIRANDA
I bet she used the TV room at night.

JAMES
I would.

James looks pensively at the house.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
You know what this reminds me of?

He looks at Miranda;  she has no idea.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
When I was a kid,  my dad used to take me
out every weekend.  Told my mom we were
having a boysí night out,  going bowling or
to the movies,  or the rodeo,  if there was
one.  Then weíd go to his girlfriendís 
house;  for a long time he was seeing my
fifth-grade health teacher.

Miranda studies him,  looking for signs of sadness at the memory and finding none.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
And Iíd sit in the car,  we had a blue
Pontiac,  and heíd leave me the keys,  and
Iíd listen to the radio.
	(laughs)
One night,  I taught myself how to drive in
that car,  waiting for my dad.  The antenna
had this bend in it. . .
	(motions with his hand)
. . . and no matter what I did I couldnít get
one damn FM station in that car.  So Iíd
sit there and listen to the country music
station and stare at the house.  I never
could take my eyes off the house.

He takes Mirandaís hand,  his eyes still on Graceland.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Just like all those damn cheating songs.
And all my life,  people would tell me,
ďJames,  youíre just like your father.Ē
And I never said it but I thought,  no Iím
not.   I never lie.  I donít pretend to be a
great guy.  The high point of my fatherís
life was a football game in high school.
No way was I going to be just like him.
But now I wonder if I can help I it.

Miranda looks confused.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Sometimes I feel like Iím going to spend
the rest of my life with everyone thinking
Iím someone Iím not.

MIRANDA
Itís hard to think about what youíre going
to do for the rest of your life.  You have
to pick one thing.   What if it doesnít
work out?
James nods.

JAMES
You look stupid.    Youíre a failure.

Miranda takes his chin in her hand and turns his face toward her.
She kisses him.

MIRANDA
I donít think you could ever be a failure.

She climbs out of the truck bed.  She reaches inside the truck and turns on the radio,  
tuning it to a slow song  (e.g. ďAsking us to danceĒ).   She climbs back up into the back 
and stands next to James,  holding her hand out to him.  He slowly gets up,  his eye

locked with hers,  and takes her hand.

They start to dance underneath the stars,  holding each other close.  James pulls her 
closer,  tight against him,  until they arenít dancing anymore.

JAMES
	(softly)
Iím scared.

MIRANDA
So am I.

The song plays on as they hold on to each other.  Finally,  James pulls away until he 
isnít touching Miranda anymore.  He takes his hand and moves it along her arm,  from 
the shoulder down to her wrist,  without touching her.

JAMES
Do  you  feel  that?
 
MIRANDA
Yeah.

The skies have become cloudy.  Thereís lightning in the distance.  Elvis comes on the 
radio and it begins to sprinkle.

INT.  SUPERMARKET - NIGHT

Itís pouring now.  James and Miranda con in, drenched.  The same two checkers are 
there.  Their names are SELMA and MARY.   Mary is black.

SELMA
Look, Mary,  if it ainít the newlyweds.

MARY
You two get married already?

JAMES
No.   We couldnít find an all-night wedding chapel.

Miranda plays her role low-key,  convincingly bitchy.

MIRANDA
Well,  maybe if you had any sense at all,
you might have planned this a little
better and we wouldnít have gotten lost in
the rain.
	(to the cashiers)
He doesnít have the sense he was born
with.

MARY
	(to James)
You sure you wanna marry this one?

James smiles fondly at Miranda

JAMES
I know sheís a handful,   but Iíd die if I
lost her.

MIRANDA
Thatís cause youíd forget to breathe if I
didnít remind you.

MARY
Well,   if youíre sure,  maybe I can help
you.   Selma,  you can cover me for five
minutes?

SELMA
Sure can.   You gonna wake Raymond?

Mary gets her purse from under the counter and pulls on a coat and rain hat.

MARY
Iím going to wake that man and tell him
thereís two young folks here and canít wait
till morning to get married.

Mary hurries out of the supermarket.

SELMA
Sheíll be right back,  she just lives down the street.

MIRANDA
Whoís Raymond?

SELMA
Raymondís her husband.   Heís a minister. 
This is so romantic.

Miranda and James look at each other, amused,  mildly panicked.

JAMES
Cold feet,   honey?

MIRANDA
I left. . . something blue in the truck.
Come with me.

They leave the supermarket.

INT.  JAMESí  TRUCK - NIGHT

They sit inside the truck,  parked outside the supermarket.

MIRANDA
Letís go.

JAMES
We canít just go.   We have to at least
tell them we changed our mind.

MIRANDA
	(laughs)
Weíll have a big blow-out of a fight.
Iíll pretend to shoot you in the leg.

JAMES
Iíve got another idea.

She looks at him.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Letís get married.

She seems to consider this,  then come to her senses.

MIRANDA
You donít get married as a joke.

JAMES
Itís not a joke.   Weíre in love.   What the
hell,  letís get married.

MIRANDA
Youíre serious.

JAMES
We are in love,  arenít we?

MIRANDA
Yeah.

JAMES
Then why havenít you ever told me?

MIRANDA
Youíre the one who had to write it on my
hand.

JAMES
I love you.

MIRANDA
I canít say it.
JAMES
Why not?

MIRANDA
Iíd be afraid to tell you how much.

James seems happy with this answer.   He notices something behind Miranda,  
outside the window.   Mary is back with her husband.  Heís a huge black man 
with a lumbering gait.  He wears a black raincoat and carries a black bible.  
Their skinny teen-age son is with them.

JAMES
Jesus.

MIRANDA
Oh my god.

Raymond comes up to the truck and puts his face against the passenger 
window.  Itís a frightening sight.  Miranda covers her mouth.  James reached 
over and turns Mirandaís face towards his.

JAMES
Marry me,  Miranda

MIRANDA
O.K.     Yes.

She looks back at Raymond.

MIRANDA
I donít see an alternative.

INT.  SUPERMARKET - NIGHT

The frozen foods section has been selected as the wedding site.  Mary and 
Selma drape pastel toilet paper over the aisles.  Raymond stacks some crates to 
use as a podium,  placing one behind for him to stand on.  Maryís son leans 
against the freezer,  flipping through a Playboy.

James is in the toiletries section,  putting gel in his hair.  Miranda comes up 
next to him and takes a toothbrush and toothpaste.

MIRANDA
I have chee-tos stuck in my teeth.

JAMES
You know,  this is exactly how I pictured
my wedding.

MIRANDA
Yeah,  mine too.   Except. . . oh,  shit.

She quickly walks away,  then back to James.   She takes off her ring and puts 
it in his hand.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
The ring.   See you at the altar.    Aisle
twelve.

Miranda hurries away.

She goes to the frozen food section.   Raymond has discovered his son reading 
Playboy.

RAYMOND
 	(bellowing)
Benjamin,  I have told you that pornography
will guarantee you reservation in the
depths of hell.

He gives special enunciation to the word ďpornographyĒ.  Ben seems 
unconcerned.   He puts down the magazine,  revealing the Metallica logo on 
his t-shirt.  Raymond hands Miranda a piece of paper.

RAYMOND  (CONTíD)
Hereís your marriage license.   Canít no
one tell you for certain thatís not the
genuine article.

MIRANDA
Thank you.

She takes Benís arm and pulls him aside.

MIRANDA
Ben,  I need a favor.

BEN
	(wicked smile)
You want a lesson from the master.   Before
your honeymoon.

She gives him a look.

MIRANDA
Do you have a Bon Jovi tape?

BEN
Bon Joviís for girls,  man.   I ainít a
girl.   My sister likes Bon Jovi.

MIRANDA
Does your sister have a Bon Jovi tape?

BEN
Sheís got every Bon Jovi tape.

Miranda smiles.

INT.  SUPERMARKET - NIGHT

Itís time for the ceremony.   Raymond stands behind his podium,  towering 
over James.   Selma and Mary stand off to the side,  beaming.

MARY
Ben,  where are you?   Get out here and be a 
witness.

BEN  (O.S.)
Coming

Thereís a click,  then music comes over the supermarket sound system.  Itís  
ďBad Medicine.Ē  Ben escorts Miranda up the aisle until she is standing next to 
James,  the runs back and cuts the music.

Raymond being the ceremony.   Heís a fundamentalists preacher and,  
apparently, even his wedding ceremony is delivered with the threat of fire and 
brimstone.

RAYMOND
	(bellowing)
Dearly beloved. . .

TIME CUT TO:

Later in the ceremony.  Sweat drips down Raymondís face as he towers over 
Miranda and James.

RAYMOND
Do you,  James,  take this woman to be your
wife,  to love and treasure like gold,
forsaking all others,  turning your back on
earthly temptations,  or you will surely
know the fires of hell in the inferno of
eternal damnation.

Raymond glares down at James,  pointing his finger.   James didnít think it was 
a question,  but it seems safer to answer.

JAMES
I do.

James slips the ring on her finger.  Raymond draws a deep breath and pulls 
back.

RAYMOND
And do you,  Miranda,  take James to be your
husband. . . .

Miranda seizes the opportunity to cut this short.

MIRANDA
I do.

RAYMOND
Then by the power vested in my by Almighty
God,  his son,  our savior,  the baby Jesus,
and the state of Tennessee,  I hereby 
pronounce you man. . .

He points at James.

RAYMOND  (CONTíD)
. . . and wife.

His finger swings over to Miranda.  Raymond wipes the sweat off his forehead.

RAYMOND  (CONTíD)
You may kiss the bride.

James and Miranda kiss.   Ben cranks up  ďBad MedicineĒ  and Mary and 
Selma throw Minute Rice.

INT.  SUPERMARKET - NIGHT

James and Miranda dance.  Eric Claptonís  ďPretty GirlĒ  plays over the sound 
system.  Mary dances with Raymond,  and  Ben reluctantly dances with Selma.

INT.  GRACELAND - DAY 

Itís morning.   James and Miranda are inside Graceland.  The tour guide 
describes the room in a loud,  rehearsed voice.  Miranda leans against James 
and gazes dreamily at Elvisí stuff.

MIRANDA
I had this dream that we got married.

JAMES
We did,  remember?

MIRANDA
No.  Me and Elvis.   I had my hair in a
huge bee-hive.

INT.  THEATER - NIGHT

The theater where the beauty pageant is being held.  Linda  Lue is onstage,  
doing a scene from ďCoal Minerís DaughterĒ.  Someone read the other parts 
woodenly from off-stage.  Linda Lue is an extremely emotional actress and 
several women in the audience wipe tears from their eyes at the end of her 
performance.

INT.  THEATER - NIGHT

The pageantís nearly over.   There are five girls on stage:  Linda Lue is one of 
them.   Miranda and James slink into the darkened theater and take two empty 
seats next to Kyle.

KYLE
	(whispering)
Where were you two?

MIRANDA
We picked up a hitchhiker that turned out
to be the ghost of Elvis.  Had to take him
to Graceland.  Sheís a finalist?

KYLE
She was the best one.   People were crying
when she did her scene.

MIRANDA
So sheís going to win?

KYLE
I donít know.   I think that redhead is
married to at least one of the judges.

On stage,  Linda Lue walks over to stand next to the host.

HOST
And now,  our last finalist,  Louise Linden.

Miranda mouths the name ďLouiseĒ, amused.

HOST  (CONTíD)
You look lovely tonight,  Louise.

LINDA LUE
Well,  thatís the idea,  ainít it?

The host chuckles.

HOST
Yes,  it is.   Now,  Louise,  hereís your
question:   Which do you consider more
important,  family or career?

LINDA LUE
By family you mean the family I plan to
have.

HOST
Yes.


LINDA LUE
Well in that case,  I would say neither.
My friends are more important to me than
my career,  whatever that may turn out to
be,  and my career is more important to me
than a husband and a bunch of screaming
kids.

The host clears his throat.

HOST
Thank you.    A very good answer.

INT.  THEATER - NIGHT

Later.    Linda Lue and the redhead are the only contestants left on stage.

HOST
And this yearís Miss Nashville is. . .   Tammy
Sue Phelps!

Tammy Sue squeals.   Linda Lue hugs her,  looking relieved.

INT.  THEATER BACKSTAGE - NIGHT

Linda Lue stands among a group of contestants,  holding a bouquet of roses.  
Miranda come up to her and hugs her.

MIRANDA
Congratulations.  Personally,  I thought
you should have won.

LINDA LUE
I canít believe they gave me runner-up
after I said that about screaming kids.

Miranda laughs.

MIRANDA
You threw it?   Cool.    How come?

LINDA LUE
Did you see my talent?

MIRANDA
No.   James and I got married.   We got here
late.

LINDA LUE
Married?

MIRANDA
	Sort of.   Iíll tell you all about it.
		Tell me how your scene went.

LINDA LUE
I was really good.    I found something I
can do,  Miranda.  I canít spend a year
cutting ribbons at supermarket openings.

MIRDANA
Well,   youíll always be a beauty queen to
me.

EXT.  STREET - DAY

Kyle is in his pick-up,  playing with the radio as he drives.   He switches from 
station to station to station,   trying to keep an eye on the traffic.

KYLE
	(to himself)
Love songs,  nothing but love songs . . .
Whose idea was love,   anyway?

He pauses on a station where the dee-jay is introducing a song,  his hand 
poised over the dial.

DEE-JAY  (V.O.)
. . . . weíve all been waiting for,  hereís the
new one from Wynonna.

The song starts;  itís Wynonna Judd,  singing Kyleís song.   Kyle realizes what 
it is,  lets out a whoop and turns up the radio.  In his excitement,  he also puts 
his foot on the gas and runs right into another truck.   Even after the accident,  
heís still grinning and listening to the radio.   He opens his door but stays in his 
truck.  The driver he hit gets out,  more surprised by the accident than angry.  
He approaches Kyle, looking at him curiously.   Kyle beams at him.  He points 
at the radio.

KYLE
Thatís my song.

The driver doesnít say anything.  He leans against Kyleís truck so he can hear 
the song, and listens appreciatively.  Then he calls out to the people who are 
gathering around because of the accident.

DRIVER
Thatís his song.  Heís got a song on the
radio!

The on-lookers move in closer sot hey can hear the radio.

INT.  JAMESí BEDROOM - DAY

Kyleís song continues over:

James and Miranda in bed.  Mirandaís wide awake, staring at the ceiling.  
James is still asleep.  He stretches,  waking up.

Miranda turns and closes her eyes,  pretending to be asleep.  James looks a 
little surprised to find Miranda in his bed;  we see the memory of the wedding 
coming back to him.   Now itís his turn to stare at the ceiling.   He reaches 
over and takes Mirandaís hand; the situation is serious but at least theyíre in it 
together.   She doesnít look at him.

INT.  JAMESí BATHROOM - DAY

James is alone in the bathroom.   He opens the medicine cabinet and has to 
search for his shaving cream.  He looks down and sees two tubes of toothpaste 
resting on opposite sides of the sink.  He closes the medicine cabinet and starts 
at the sight of his own reflection,  as if heís looking at himself for the first time.

INT.  JAMESí KITCHEN - DAY

Miranda looks in the refrigerator,  which is nearly empty.  She lifts the lid on a 
pizza box,  takes out a slice and takes a bite.  She sits down at the kitchen table 
and looks out at the quiet street.  Her eyes move down to her hands.  She 
holds them in front of her and examines them,  like  someone elseís hands.  She 
touches the ring James gave her, which looks cheap in the bright morning light.  
She twists it off her finger and holds it in her fist, drawing her knees up to her 
chest.

EXT.  MUSIC ROW - DAY

James pulls his truck up outside one of the houses,  the office for Doug 
Robertsí management company.   He stays inside the truck,  looking at the 
building.

INT  JAMESí KITCHEN - DAY

Miranda sits at the table,  her notebook open in front of her,  a blank page.  
She slides the ring back and forth on her pen.

INT.  DOUG ROBERTSí OFFICE - DAY

Doug sits behind his desk.  He has a black eye.  James stands in front of him, 
pleading his case.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

The music ends.  Miranda shows up for work.  Lucy looks surprised to see her.

LUCY
Youíre early.

Miranda looks at her watch.

MIRANDA
I am?

LUCY
Forty-five minutes.  You feeling all
right?  You look exhausted.
Miranda sits down at the bar.

MIRANDA
	(matter-of-fact)
We got married.

LUCY
You and James?   Congratulations!

Miranda looks at Lucy like she things she might be joking.

MIRANDA
I thought you might disapprove.

LUCY
Well,  honey,  I got me a whole new attitude
on the subject of love.

She holds out her left hand.   Thereís a diamond ring on her
finger.   Miranda smiles.

MIRANDA
This canít be from Nick.   You canít even
tolerate Nick.   Youíre never going to
forgive him for as long as you live.

LUCY
I changed my mind.

MIRANDA
I tried to tell you about that song.

LUCY
I donít know why he didnít just come out
and tell me how he really felt.

MIRANDA
Maybe the same reason you didnít tell him.

LUCY
Weíre having an engagement party Friday.
Weíd like you to sing.

MIRANDA
O.K.

LUCY
Original material only.

MIRANDA
Oh.     I donít have anything good enough

LUCY
Well,   youíve got two days.   Youíll come up
with something.

MIRANDA
When did you turn into such an optimist?

LUCY
I have to admit,  Iím starting to believe
in happy endings.   Looks at you and James  -
I never did figure that boy to be the type
to commit.

MIRANDA
It kind of happened when he wasnít
looking.

LUCY
I donít think he does anything without
looking first.  If he said  ďI doĒ , then he
does.

Miranda smiles,  reassured.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

Later that night,  Miranda brings some customers their drinks and heads back 
to the bar.  On her way,  she runs into James.

MIRANDA
Hey.     I know you.

JAMES
Can you take a break?

MIRANDA
Not right now.

JAMES
You want to know what I did today?

MIRANDA
What did you do today?

JAMES
I went to see Doug.   I told him heíd be
all kinds of sorry if he let me get away.
That kind of line works like you wouldnít
believe.
Miranda smiles.

MIRANDA
I might.

JAMES
I leave for Austin day after tomorrow.   I
start recording next week.

The smile leaves Mirandaís face.

MIRANDA
Austin?   Youíre aware youíre already in
the country music recording capital of the
world.

JAMES
I get to use my musicians this time.   This
is everything I wanted.   I thought youíd
be happy for me.

MIRANDA
How long will you be gone?

JAMES
I donít know.   A month or two.

MIRANDA
Youíre just taking off?   Day after
tomorrow.   And you arenít going to ask me
if I want to come.

James is surprised that sheís upset.    He looks around to see if anyone is 
looking at them.   No one is.

JAMES

What are you going to do,  quit your job so
you can hang around and watch me record
all day?   I thought youíd want to stay
here.

MIRANDA
	(loudly)
The fact that weíre married doesnít mean
that you get to decide what I want.

Now a few people turn to look.

JAMES
What does it mean?

Sheís getting progressively louder,  and so is James.   Lucy notices that theyíre 
fighting.

JAMES
Iím not even sure we are married,  so if
you want out,  just let me know.  I can
tear up the certificate.

MIRANDA
Donít pull this on me.   Youíre the one
whoís leaving.   Maybe youíve gotten what
you wanted out of this.   You proved to
yourself that you could commit to 
something.   Well,   a commitment lasts more
than two days.

They notice everyone staring at them and lower their voices.

JAMES
You think youíve got me all figured out.

MIRANDA
Maybe you can only commit to one thing at
a time.   I guess we know what your one
thing is.

JAMES
Youíre the one who canít see past two
months from now.   I donít think you can
see this marriage in a week from now.

MIRANDA
I just donít think thereíll be anything to see.
	(hurt)
You asked me to marry you.

She twists the ring off her finger and holds it in her fist,  looking like she might 
throw it.   Instead she drops her fist, turns around, and walks away.   James 
watches her for only a second before he turns and leaves.

INT.  MOTEL ROOM - DAY

Miranda sleeps in her old bed.   In the other half of the room, Linda Lue is 
packing to leave.  The dog climbs in her suitcase and she pulls him out and sets 
him on the bed.   It looks like sheís almost done.   Her side of the room now 
looks like a typical tacky motel room;  no floral bedspread,  no picture of 
Loretta Lynn.  Miranda opens her eyes.

LINDA LUE
Hey,  you.   I thought you were going to
sleep through my departure.

MIRANDA
And miss the opportunity to see another
piece of my life crumble away?

Linda Lue looks concerned.

LINDA LUE
Do you want to tell me what happened with
you and James?

Mirada sits up.

MIRANDA
I think the marriage just woke him up.   We
realized he didnít want to be with me for
the rest of his life.   The wedding thing
was a big mistake.

LINDA LUE
(meaningful)
And you didnít have any second thoughts of
your own.

MIRANDA
Heís the one who left me.

Linda Lue sits next to her on the bed.

LINDA LUE
Can I tell you a story?

MIRANDA
How many people die in this story?

LINDA LUE
Just one.   When my Aunt Lydia  was
eighteen,  she was engaged to marry Henry
Esterbrook.   However,  the week before the
wedding,  Henry eloped with Marianna Fine.
Aunt Lydia was so devastated she thought
sheíd rather be dead than be without
Henry,  so she decided to hang herself.

MIRANDA
Has it occurred to you that this story is
completely inappropriate for this
situation?

LINDA LUE
Thereís more.   Lydia went to the hardware
store to buy a length of good strong rope,
she couldnít have weighed less than two
hundred pounds,  and the man that sold her
that rope turned out to be her destiny.
She married him that summer.   My Uncle
Ernie.

MIRANDA
Which one of them dies?

LINDA LUE
My Uncle Ernie was bitten by a poison
centipede later that same year.   He died
instantly.   But that is beside the point
and you know it.  There is someone out
there for everyone,  and even if your head
doesnít know it,  your heart does.

MIRANDA
So her heart led her to the hardware
store.

LINDA LUE
Just like yours took to Memphis.
Remember the night I met you?   I read your
palm?

MIRANDA
Yeah.   But you didnít read my heart line.

Linda Lue gives her a knowing look.

LINDA LUE
Sometimes people want to be surprised.

Linda Lue reaches for Mirandaís hand.  Miranda lets her take it.  Linda Lue 
examines it; we get the idea she may inventing the reading.

LINDA LUE  (CONTíD)
See,  itís the same as before.   You are not
one to settle for the easiest thing - I
think thatís true.  A challenging
relationship. . .  that can be very romantic;
to me that seemed like you and James,  both
of you so pig-headed.

MIRANDA
This  isnít  helping.

LINDA LUE
The important thing to know is to follow
your heart.   Donít go against what itís
telling you,  and donít bury anything that
ainít dead.

Miranda pulls her hand back.

MIRANDA
Whoís going to die now?

Linda Lue smiles.

LINDA LUE
No one that you donít kill with your own
two hands.   You know,  maybe next week
would be a better time for me to leave.

MIRANDA
No,  honestly,   I couldnít stand you or Mr.
Buster Dog another day.   Go to Hollywood
and tell them who the hell you are.

Linda Lue hugs her,  then gets up and closes her suitcase.

INT.  MOTEL ROOM - DAY

Linda Lue and the dog are gone.   Miranda sits cross-legged on her bed,  her 
notebook open in front of her.   We hear Pam Tillis passionately singing  
ďMaybe it was Memphis.Ē

Miranda picks up a piece of paper that looks like her marriage certificate.  She 
folds it in half and cuts it into a heart shape.  She unfolds it,  and cuts the heart 
into pieces with a jagged break.   She positions them on a page of her 
notebook.

Thereís a knock at the door.   Miranda opens it to find Kyle standing there.

EXT.  REDíS BAR - NIGHT

Kyle leads Miranda out of the bar;  sheís a little tipsy.  They pass a man in a       
cowboy hat standing on the sidewalk,  singing for tips.   Miranda sings along 
with him.

KYLE
I donít know how productive this was . . .

MIRANDA
Well,  Iím having a pretty good time.
Letís go somewhere else.  Wanna go to
Graceland?

Kyleís just trying to get her into the car without incident.

KYLE
Letís get you home.

MIRANDA
I donít get it.

KYLE
What.

MIRANDA
This whole thing.   Whatís the matter with
me?

KYLE
Nothing.     You are perfect.

MIRANDA
No.      Thereís something wrong with me.
Nobody wants me.   Nobody cares about me.

Sheís really getting upset.   Kyle wraps his arms around her,  holding her like a 
child.

KYLE
	(soothing)
I care.    I want you.

She shakes her head no.   He strokes her hair back off her face.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
I care.     I care about you.

Miranda still doesnít look like sheís herself.

MIRANDA
Do you love me?

Kyle loosens his hold on her;  he has to protect himself now.

KYLE
Miranda,   donít ask me that right now.

MIRANDA
	(persistent)
Are you in love with me?

Kyle pulls away from her altogether.

KYLE
Yes.

She pulls him to her slowly and kisses him,  passionately.   He kisses her back,  
then breaks away gently and looks at her,  quietly angry.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
I donít know what youíre doing,  but stop
it now.    I wonít let you use me.

She feels terrible;  she was using him.

MIRANDA
Iím sorry.    Really.

KYLE
Damn it,  Miranda,  what do you want me to
do?

MIRANDA
I donít know.   I want you to stay in love
with me always, and I want you to get over
me and be my friend forever.

KYLE
Do you think I have some kind of choice?

Miranda gives him a questioning look;   she really doesnít understand how he 
feels.

KYLE  (CONTíD)
Sometimes you hear a song on the radio,
and itís just the song you wanted to hear
right then.   Itís like a gift.   Then itís 
over,  and youíre just glad you heard it.
You donít want them to play it again right
away.   Youíll hear that song again,  or
another one thatís just the perfect song
when you hear it.

MIRANDA
And Iím like that song,  the first one.

KLYE
No,  you are nothing like that first one.
Youíre like if there was only one song in
the world I could hear for the rest of my
life,  what song would that be.    Youíre
that song.

MIRANDA
Maybe the needleís just stuck.

KYLE
Youíre the song that stays in my head all
day,  and I donít even mind it.  Youíre my
favorite song.

MIRANDA
For awhile,  my favorite song was  ďShadow
DanciníĒ.  Itís not anymore.

KYLE
	(angry)
You know what the problem with you is?
You make it so hard for someone to care
about you that once they do,  thereís no
turning back.  Itís hot or cold,  thereís
no lukewarm.

Kyle realizes something, sadly.
KYLE  (CONTíD)
		Thatís why Jamesíll come back

Miranda wonít allow herself to hope for this.

MIRANDA
No he wonít.  Itís o.k.    This kind of
thing happens to me all the time.

KYLE
Miranda.    What are you going to do when he
comes back?

Miranda sits down on the curb.   Kyle sits next to her.

MIRANDA
Iím not going to be here.    Iím going back
home.

This is the last thing Kyle wants to hear.

KYLE
This is your home.

MIRANDA
Do you know how hard it was to leave New
York?   I had wanted to do it for years and
then my father died,  and I just did it,
left everything behind.   I think I thought
I could pay him back,  for giving up his
dream.  Now I know he wouldíve given it up
sooner or later anyway.   When you think
you have a dream,  all it does is give you
hope that you can have something good,
then you find out you can never have that.
Maybe it wasnít even there to be had.

KYLE
Donít think that.   You canít live your
life thinking that.

MIRANDA
Kyle,  all the signs are pointing in the
same direction.   Away from Nashville.
Away from country music.   At some point,  I
have to pay attentions.   I have to start
again.

KYLE
You could do that here.   You didnít come
here because of your father.   You came
here to write songs.

MIRANDA
Saying youíre going to do something and 
actually doing it are two different things.

KYLE
You have them inside you.   What if you go 
to New York and you never get them out?

MIRANDA
Donít make me feel any worse.   This is all
I have left.

Kyle shakes his head,  disagreeing.

KYLE
You still have everything that matters.

She doesnít answer.   They sit side by side,  watching traffic pass by.

EXT.  JAMESí HOUSE - DAY

Itís early in the morning.   James comes out to his truck,  throws a bag in it,  
and gets in.

INT.  GREYHOUND STATION - DAY

Miranda,  carrying her guitar and suitcase,  buys a bus ticket.

EXT.  HIGHWAY - DAY

We see the Greyhound  travelling down the highway.

INT.  GREYHOUND BUS - DAY

Miranda sits by a window,  staring out.  She reaches into her backpack,  pulls 
out her walkman,  and puts on the headphones.

EXT.  HIGHWAY - DAY
A different highway.  We see James in his truck,  heading out of Nashville in a 
different direction.

INT.  GREYHOUND BUS - DAY

Miranda fumbles through her backpack until she finds what she was looking 
for;  a Bon Jovi cassette.   She takes the tape out of its case and pops it in her 
walkman.  She presses play.  We hear what she hears,  but itís not Bon Jovi.   
Itís country music - her father singing one of his songs.  Miranda is startled.  
She quickly hit stop,  taking out the tape to look at it.  Verifying what it is,  she 
puts it back in her walkman and hits play.

INT.  JAMESí TRUCK - DAY

James is driving,   absently singing  ďBad  MedicineĒ to himself.

INT.  GREYHOUD BUS - DAY

Miranda stares out the window,  the tape still going in her walkman.  We hear 
whatís on the tape - now itís a letter from her father.

VOICE ON TAPE
. . . . that one was your favorite when you
were two,  you probably donít remember.
And that concludes the musical portion of
our program.  I hope theyíre teaching you
how to skin rattlesnakes at that camp,
Iíve been setting snake traps all over the
yard.  I used Ding-Dongs for bait.   I
expect to have about thirty-seven by the
time you come home.   So donít worry about
me,  Iím doing fine without you.   Iíll miss
you now,  and you can miss me when you get
home.  That way Iíll be there.  Chin up.

Thatís the end of the tape.   Miranda listens to the silence.   She raises her chin,  
then lowers it and gives into her tears.

INT.  JAMESí TRUCK - DAY
James has picked up a hitchhiker, and old man who listens passively while 
James rambles on.

JAMES
. . . thinks she knows everything about me.
Probably thinks I decided to leave because
of her,  like the world revolves around
her . . .  she thought she had me with that
marriage thing . . . I might have
better things to do with the rest of my
life . . .

He trails off.

HITCHHIKER
Like what?

James looks at the old man,  startled.

EST.  TRUCK STOP - DAY

The Greyhound is stopped at the truck stop.  Miranda gets off.  She puts on 
her sunglasses and looks around.

EXT.  HIGHWAY - DAY

James pulls over and lets the hitchhiker out at a gas station.  The old man 
waves as the truck pulls back onto the highway.  James drives in the same 
direction as before for about ten seconds,  then pulls a U-turn and heads back 
toward Nashville.

INT.  TRUCK STOP COFFEE SHOP - DAY

Miranda sits in a booth in the coffee shop,  looking out the window as her bus 
pulls away.

INT.  JAMESí BEDROOM - DAY

James goes through a dresser,  opening and closing drawers.  Theyíre all 
empty.  He goes into the kitchen and finds a house key on the table. 

INT. COFFEE SHOP - DAY

Miranda has fallen asleep on the table.  The waitress comes by and touches her 
arm.   Miranda raises her head and squints at her.

WAITRESS
Youíve been asleep for an hour.   Iíve been 
watching your stuff,  but my shiftís  over
now.

MIRANDA
Thanks.

The waitress fills her coffee  cup.   Miranda looks down at the table.   Her 
notebook is open;  the page is filled with words.   She looks at them,  as if for 
the first time.   She doesnít seem sure if she likes what she sees.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

James comes into the cafť and finds Lucy and Nickís engagement party in 
progress.  A singer onstage dedicates a song to the happy couple,  who sit at a 
table near the back.   James looks around for Miranda and,  not seeing her,  
goes over to Lucy and Nick.

JAMES
Is Miranda here?

LUCY
No, honey,  Iím sorry.

Lucy doesnít want to have to tell him

LUCY
She told me she was going back to New
York.

This is a blow,  but James still has hope.

JAMES
	(urgent)
When?

LUCY
She left this morning.

James deflates,  his hope gone.

LUCY  (CONTíD)
Honey,  why donít  you  sit down.  Iíll get
you some champagne.

James shakes his head.

JAMES
Beer.

Lucy nods and gets up.   James sits down next to Nick.

JAMES  (CONTíD)
Congratulations.

NICK
Thank you.

JAMES
You want some advice from an old married
man?   Donít leave her.

NICK
The important thing is you came back for
her.   No matter what happens,  you did the
right thing.

James finds this little consolation.

INT.  LUCYíS CAF… - NIGHT

Later that night.   Kyle is onstage,  performing a love song for Lucy and Nick.  
James has moved to the bar;  he faces away from the stage.

Miranda walks in,  carrying her guitar.  She finds Lucy and goes to her.  Lucy 
is happy to see her.  They have a brief conversation, which we donít hear 
because Kyle is singing.  We now that Lucy tells her James is here,  because 
Miranda looks over to where he sits.  She looks apprehensive,  then takes a 
deep breath and regains her resolve.

Kyle finishes his song.   Lucy comes onstage and speaks into the microphone.

LUCY
Kyle Davidson.   Thank you,  Kyle.

Everyone applauds as Kyle climbs off the stage.  He sees Miranda waiting to 
go on and grins,  surprised and glad that sheís back.  He hugs her,  and we see 
from the look on his face that he knows heís really lost her now.

The applause dies down.

LUCY
Now,  this next performer is kind of 
special to me, and Iím real glad she could
make it here tonight.   Here she is,
Miranda Presley.

James turns around.  Miranda sits on the stool and positions the stand so that 
she can read the pages she tore from her notebook.  She looks nervous,  but 
determined.  She doesnít look at James.

Miranda begins to play.  She begins to sing the lyrics, looking down and 
reading them.  The song sheís written is beautiful, and expresses a personal 
journey.  Sheís realized that she has to accept her painful emotions before she 
can experience joy.  The song hardly resembles the one she auditioned with 
earlier,  but the one line she said she didnít understand is still there,  and fits 
perfectly in the new version of the song.

The audience recognizes the beauty of this song.  Most just enjoy it,  but we 
see pride on the faces of Nick,  Lucy,  and Kyle.  James looks like someone 
whoíd fallen in love all over again.  Miranda realizes that everyone is listening 
to what she has to say,  and she loves it.  She looks at James, letting him know 
the man she loves in the song is him.  She finishes the song,  and thereís a 
pause before everyone applauds.  Jamesí seat is now empty.  She smiles 
triumphantly and gets off the stage.  Sheís looking for James but she doesnít 
see him.  People are congratulating her,  but sheís starting to worry.  Suddenly, 
someone takes her hand.  She looks next to her and sees James.

MIRANDA
	(relieved)
I thought you had left.

JAMES
I did,  but I came back.   I thought you had
left.

MIRANDA
I did,  but I came back.

She notices something in her hand.

MIRANDA  (CONTíD)
Whatís this?

She looks;  itís a thin silver wedding ring.

JAMES
I figured out the best thing to do with
the rest of my life.

She holds the ring out to him.   Confused,  he takes it back.  She presents him 
her left hand,  and he slips it on her finger.   They kiss.   When they break 
apart,  James notices something behind Miranda.   He puts his hands on her 
shoulders and turns her around to look.

Lucy opens up the case where she keeps original copies of special songs,  and 
pins Mirandaís song up next to them.   Miranda watches,  smiling.

THE END
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